Gourami Tank Mates: 31 Top Choices & What To Look For

When it comes to the best gourami tank mates, there are a few essential things to consider, such as compatibility between other fish and the size and aggression of the gourami. This article provides specific tips for choosing tank mates for different types of gouramis, such as dwarf, blue, honey, opaline, three-spot, pearl, sparkling, and kissing gouramis. Read on!

What To Look For When Choosing Tank Mates

When picking tank mates for your gouramis, there are a few key points to consider. Here are 5 things to look for when choosing tank mates! 

1. Compatibility

The most crucial factor in choosing tank mates is ensuring they are compatible with your gourami. Do research to ensure the fish you’re interested in will get along with your gouramis and won’t become aggressive towards them. 

2. Size

Gouramis come in a wide range of sizes, so you’ll want to make sure that the tank mates you choose are the right size. Avoid fish that are much larger or smaller than your gouramis, as they could lead to bullying and other issues.

3. Activity level

Different fish species have different activity levels, so it’s important to make sure you choose a fish with similar activity levels as your gouramis. Actively swimming fish may disturb more slow-moving gouramis and vice versa.

4. Water parameters

Different fish have different water temperatures, pH, and hardness requirements, so it’s crucial to find tank mates that can tolerate the same water parameters as your gouramis. Ideal water parameters for gouramis are between 21-28°C, 6.5-7.5 pH and 5-20 dGH.

5. Diet

Different fish species have different dietary needs, so it’s important to make sure that you choose tank mates that can coexist peacefully in terms of food. Gouramis are omnivores, so they should do well with other fish with similar diets. 

Can Gouramis Go In A Community Tank?

The short answer is yes! Gouramis are peaceful and will do well in a community tank if they have compatible tank mates. However, it’s important to remember the 5 things we discussed above when choosing tank mates for your gouramis.

You must also ensure they provide their gouramis with plenty of good hiding spots and areas to explore. Floating plants or densely planted areas will give your gouramis a sense of security and provide them with breeding grounds.

Additionally, ensure you regularly clean the tank and do water changes so that your gouramis stay healthy and happy. With the right care, your gouramis will be a wonderful addition to any aquarium! 

Do Gouramis Need Tank Mates?

Gouramis can be kept independently, but they may benefit from having other fish in the tank. Having other fish around will give your gouramis company, which can help reduce stress levels and make them feel more secure. 

Gouramis are quite social and do best when kept in groups of at least 6 individuals, so having some tank mates can help create a sense of security. They usually get along with peaceful fish or fish that live in other parts of the tank than the bottom. 

They may become territorial with other bottom dwellers and some larger species, so it’s important to do your research before adding any fish. 

The Short List

  1. Corydoras Catfish
  2. Neon Tetra
  3. Guppies
  4. Harlequin Rasboras
  5. Platies
  6. Siamese algae eater
  7. Otocinclus Catfish
  8. Zebra Danios
  9. Zebra Loach
  10. Mollies
  11. Common Pleco
  12. Bristlenose Pleco
  13. Platies
  14. Swordtails
  15. Pygmy Corydoras
  16. Otocinclus Catfish
  17. Glowlight Tetra
  18. Cherry Barbs
  19. Dwarf Neon Rainbowfish
  20. Kuhli Loaches
  21. Hillstream Loaches
  22. Green Neon Tetra
  23. Rummy Nose Tetra
  24. Panda Corydoras
  25. Ember Tetra
  26. Yoyo Loach
  27. Dwarf Pencil Fish
  28. Chinese Algae Eater
  29. Angelfish
  30. Congo Tetras
  31. Rosy Barbs

31 Best Tank Mates For Gourami’s

There are so many great tank mates for you to choose from, it can be hard to decide. It’s also important to remember that certain gouramis will get along well with certain tank mates.

However, here’s a general idea of what tank mates can live with your gouramis!

Corydoras Catfish

bronze/common corydoras care sheet

Corydoras Catfish get along well with gouramis thanks to how calm they are, as well as the fact they live at the bottom of the tank.

They do well in most community tanks and will live happily with other peaceful fish without any trouble. Corydoras are also great at foraging and removing waste from substrate in your tank, which helps keep the tank clean and healthy overall.

  • pH: 6.0 – 8.0
  • Temperature: 68 – 82°F 
  • Tank Size: 10 gallons 
  • Fish Size: 2.5 inches 
  • Lifespan: 10 years 
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Neon Tetra

Neon Tetra Care Sheet

Neon tetras are peaceful fish that generally like the same condition as most gouramis. This combined with their ability to swim fast means they can get away from your gouramis unscathed.

Because of this, they can live together in a community tank without fighting or getting stressed out. Also, their bright colors can create a beautiful display that can make any aquarium look even better.

  • pH: 4.0 – 7.5
  • Temperature: 72 – 78°F 
  • Tank Size: 10 gallons for a small school of 6-8
  • Fish Size: 1.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 – 8 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Guppies

guppy care sheet

People often put guppies and gouramis in the same tank because they have the same water requirements an eat the same things.

When you put them in your tank you’ll notice their bright colors and gentle swimming make the aquarium an extremely relaxing thing to watch.

Still, it’s important to monitor how they act and give them enough space and hiding places to avoid them stressing your gouramis, which could create unnecessary aggression.

  • pH: 6.8 – 7.8
  • Temperature: 74 – 82°F 
  • Tank Size: 5 gallons for a small group of 2-3
  • Fish Size: 1.5 – 2.5 inches 
  • Lifespan: 1-3 years 
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Harlequin Rasboras

harlequin rasbora care sheet

Harlequin Rasboras are another small fish that love the same water conditions as most Gourami’s. This makes them a great tank mates to add with your gourami. On top of this, their unique dynamics and social behavior can add more life and activity to the aquarium.

On top of this their more subdued colors are going to help the colors of your gouramis stand out even more especially dwarf, honey and pearl gouramis!

  • pH: 6.0 – 7.8
  • Temperature: 72 – 81°F 
  • Tank Size: 10 gallons for a small school of 6
  • Fish Size: 2 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 – 8 years 
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy 

Platies

Platies are some of the biggest staples in the aquarium world, in big part thanks to their calm and peaceful demeanour. You’ll notice that both platies and gouramis tend to frequent the same area of the tank, however, so make sure that if you’re keeping these two together, to add lots of hiding places.

On top of this, remember that platies are going to give birth to live young frequently, so you’ll need to make sure that they’re all getting eaten, otherwise, you’ll end up with more inhabitants in your tank then you may want.

  • pH: 6.8 – 8.5
  • Temperature: 70 – 80°F 
  • Tank size: 10 gallons
  • Fish size: 2.5 inches 
  • Lifespan: 2 – 5 years 
  • Difficulty keeping: Easy

Siamese Algae Eater

siamese algae eater care sheet

Siamese algae eaters and gouramis get along well in the same tank because they both eat and live in different places in the tank. SAE’s tend to stay near the bottom of the tank, whereas most gouramis swim near the middle or top. This makes it less likely that they will fight or try to take over each other’s territory.

One thing to note about SAE’s is that they can grow quite large, up to 6″ in length, so make sure you’re putting them with bigger gouramis, and that there’s enough space in the tank for them.

Siamese Algae Eater Care: From Start To Finish

  • pH: 6.5 – 8.0
  • Temperature: 75 – 79°F 
  • Tank size: 30 gallons
  • Fish size: 6 inches 
  • Lifespan: 10 years
  • Difficulty keeping: Moderate

Otocinclus Catfish

otocinclus catfish care sheet

Otocinclus are small, shy fish known for their algae eating ability. So keeping them in your tank is going to keep the tank clean! They’re also active swimmers that tend to stay near the bottom of the tank, meaning you won’t have to worry about them bumping into your gouramis most of the time.

If you do plan on keeping Otocinclus catfish in your tank, just make sure that they’re getting enough plant matter, and that there’s enough algae for them to eat.

  • pH: 6.0 – 7.5
  • Temperature: 73 – 81°F 
  • Tank Size: 20 gallons 
  • Fish Size: 2 inches 
  • Lifespan: 5 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy to moderate

Zebra Danios

zebra danio care sheet

Zebra Danios are calm, friendly fish, that are extremely hardy, and can survive most aquarium conditions. One of the reasons they are great with gouramis is thanks to how fast they can swim, meaning, they can often evade even more aggressive gouramis.

  • pH: 6.5 – 7.5
  • Temperature: 64 – 78°F
  • Tank Size: 10 gallons for a small school of 6
  • Fish Size: 2 inches
  • Lifespan: 3 – 5 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Zebra Loach

Zebra loach Care Sheet

Zebra Loaches and Gourami’s are great tank mates thanks to the fact they both grow to a similar size, which means it’s less likely your gouramis will bully them. On top of this Zebra Loaches live and eat at the bottom of the tank, which means they will rarely venture into your gouramis territory. 

Make sure you’re adding lots of sinking pellets to your tank so that your Zebra loaches never go without food however.

  • pH: 6.0 – 7.5 pH
  • Temperature: 70 – 79 °F
  • Tank Size: 30 galloon
  • Fish Size: 3.5 in
  • Lifespan: 8 – 15 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy to intermediate

Mollies

Mollies and Gouramis like the same water conditions, parameters, and general environment, making them great tank mates. In general, mollies are a little bigger than most Gouramis, so make sure you’re adding enough hiding places in your tank to keep your gouramis feeling safe.

Apart from this though, mollies are peaceful fish that won’t show aggression, so don’t worry about them trying to harass your blue gouramis.

Lastly, both these guys like the same kinds of food, so it’s easy and quick to feed them.

  • pH: 7.5 – 8.5
  • Temperature: 71 – 82 °F
  • Tank Size: 20 gallons for a group of six or more
  • Fish Size: 3-5 inches 
  • Lifespan: 3-5 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Common Pleco

common pleco care sheet

Plecos are peaceful catfish that stay near the bottom of the tank keeping themselves to themselves. On the other hand, Gourami’s like to be in the middle or top of the tank, which means they’ll spend most of their time avoiding each other.

If you keep common plecos in your tank, you’ll notice that they’re going to eat all the algae and a lot of the waste in the tank. However, because of their large size, don’t keep them in a tank smaller than 75 gallons.

  • pH: 7.0-8.0
  • Temperature: 74-80°F
  • Tank Size: 75 gallons 
  • Fish Size: 15 inches
  • Lifespan: 10-15 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Bristlenose Pleco

bristlenose pleco care sheet

Bristlenose plecos, like other plecos spend most of their time at the bottom of the tank, eating algae, and waste which helps keep the water clean. They are calm, friendly fish, who are mostly unbothered by any other fish in the tank.

One thing to know about bristlenose plecos is that they need a large tank, so don’t put them in a tank which is smaller than 30 gallons.

  • pH: 6.5 – 7.5
  • Temperature: 70 – 80°F 
  • Tank Size: 30 gallons 
  • Fish Size: 3 – 5 inches 
  • Lifespan: 5 years 
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy 

Swordtails

Swordtail Care Sheet

Swordtails are beautiful fish that get their name from how the lower part of tails which stretch out like a sword. They’re friendly fish that rarely attack other fish, or show signs of aggression, however, they also don’t let other fish push them around, making them great tank mates for gouramis.

They usually stay in the middle of the tank, so make sure you’re providing adequate hiding places for them.

On top of this they’re hardy fish that won’t be picky about what they eat, so they will gladly eat what your honey gouramis are eating!

  • pH: 7.0 -8.4
  • Temperature: 72 – 79°F 
  • Tank Size: 20 gallons 
  • Fish Size: 3 – 5 inches 
  • Lifespan: 3-5 years 
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy 

Pygmy Corydoras

pygmy corydoras care sheet

Pygmy Cory’s are small fish that scour the bottom of your tank looking for food to eat. Because they’re bottom dwellers, they won’t enter other areas of the tank which means they’ll stay away from your Gouramis.

While they may enter the middle area of the tank every once in a while, this is generally brief and they’ll normally swim back down after a few seconds.

Make sure you’re keeping them in groups of 5 or more to ensure they’re at their happiest. And of course, ensure there’s always enough food in the tank for them, by keeping it well planted and feeding them catfish pellets.

  • pH: 6 – 8
  • Temperature: 72 – 79 °F 
  • Tank Size: 10 gallons 
  • Fish Size: 1 inch
  • Lifespan: 3 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy 

Glowlight Tetra

Glowlight Tetra Care Sheet

Tetras are a great addition to any aquarium. And glowlight Tetras are an even better choice as they’re not as brightly colored as their relatives, so your Gourami’s are less likely to see them as competitors.

If you planned on keeping glowlight tetras in your tank you’ll notice them swimming in schools where they are quite active, but not overactive or energetic.

They are incredibly easy to care for, and as long as you’re adding enough hiding places to the tank and feeding them, they’ll make great tank mates for your honey gouramis.

  • pH: 5.8-7.5
  • Temperature: 74 – 82°F
  • Tank Size: 10 gallons
  • Fish Size: 1 – 1.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 2 – 4 years

Cherry Barb

Cherry Barb Care Sheet

Cherry Barbs are peaceful, active fish that get along well with most gouramis. You’ll notice they have a beautiful reddish-pink color that contrasts well with most species of gourami!

If you want to add cherry barbs to your tank with gouramis, remember, they should be kept in groups of 6 or more, so make sure you have the right size tank for them.  If they’re not kept in big enough groups then aggression may occur in their groups.

Lastly, cherry barbs are omnivores just like gouramis, so you can feed them all the same food.

  • pH: 6.0 – 8.0
  • Temperature: 73 – 81°F
  • Tank Size: 25 – 30 gallons  
  • Fish Size: 2 inches
  • Lifespan: 5-7 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy 
betta care facebook group

Dwarf Neon Rainbowfish

Dwarf Neon Rainbowfish Care Sheet

Dwarf Neon Rainbowfish are a vibrant and colorful addition to any tank.

Being peaceful fish, dwarf neon rainbowfish are going to make great tank mates for gouramis, especially dwarf gouramis. Just make sure that you’re adding lots of hiding places and plants for both species of fish, as they tend to swim in the same areas of the tank.

You don’t have to worry about feeding your Dwarf Neon Rainbowfish anything in particular, as they’ll eat whatever your opaline gouramis are eating.

  • pH: 6.0 – 8.0
  • Temperature: 74 – 82°F
  • Tank Size: 15 gallons
  • Fish Size: 2.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 4 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Medium

Kuhli Loaches

Kuhli Loach Care Sheet

Another extremely unique looking fish to consider for your gouramis are Kuhli loaches!

Kuhli Loaches and gouramis both have the same water temperature, and pH needs, and while Kuhli loaches stay near the bottom of the tank, your gouramis will stay near the middle or top! Which means they’ll never bother each other.

If you do plan on keeping kuhli loaches in your tank, keep them in groups of 3 or more, so make sure you have the right size tank for them.   

  • pH: 5.5 – 6.5
  • Temperature: 75 – 86°F
  • Tank Size: 20 gallons
  • Fish Size: 3-4 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy to intermediate

Hillstream Loaches

Hillstream Loach Care Sheet

The Hillstream Loach is one of the most interesting looking fish you can add to your aquarium, and they make great tank mates for gouramis.

If you want to keep hillstream loaches with Gourami make sure that you have a powerful filter to provide them with the current they need in order to stay healthy. In fact, without a strong enough current they may even die.

Besides from this, hillstream loaches are going to be great tank mates for gouramis thanks to how easy going they are, and the fact, they live in different areas in the tank.

  • pH: 6.0-7.5
  • Temperature: 65 – 80°F
  • Tank Size: 50 gallons
  • Fish Size: 2 – 3 inches
  • Lifespan: 8 – 10 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Green Neon Tetra

Green Neon Tetra Care Sheet

Green Neon Tetra’s are similar to regular Neon Tetras, however, the striking stripe that runs down their side is tinted with a lot more green.

They’re active and peaceful fish, which will do great in a tank with most Gourami’s. Just make sure you’re keeping your green neon tetras in a school of 6 or more so they don’t become stressed and nippy.

Both green neon tetras and gouramis are going to thrive a lot better in tanks that are densely planted, so this is something to consider when adding them together.

  • pH: 3 – 6.5
  • Temperature: 75 – 85°F 
  • Tank Size: 20 gallons
  • Fish Size: 1.4 inches
  • Lifespan: 2-3 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy 

Rummy Nose Tetra

Rummy Nose Tetra Care Sheet

Rummy Nose Tetra are incredibly peaceful and make great tank mates not just gourami’s but most species of fish!. If you do plan on keeping them ensure you have a large enough tank for them, and provide plenty of hiding places.

Feed them a variety of foods, as they are omnivores and need both plant matter and animal protein to stay happy and healthy. 

Keep them in schools of 6 or more to ensure they remain happy and stress free.

  • pH: 5.6 – 7.4
  • Temperature: 72-84° F
  • Tank Size: 20 gallons
  • Fish Size: 2 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 – 6 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Moderate

Panda Corydoras

Panda Corydoras Fish Care Sheet

The gentle little armored Panda Corydoras is one of the best fish to keep in a tank with gourami’s, especially pearl gourami’s. These peaceful fish aren’t super flashy, but their black and white stripes certainly add a unique take to your tank.

On top of this, both fish like the same kinds of water conditions, and whatever your gourami doesn’t eat, your panda cory’s will which means they’re perfect tank mates. 

  • pH: 6.0 – 7.0
  • Temperature: 68 – 77°F
  • Tank Size: 10 gallons
  • Fish Size: 2 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Moderate

Ember Tetra

Ember Tetra Care Sheet

Ember tetras are beautiful red fish which contrast perfectly with the plants in your tank and make great tank mates for gouramis. They’re a little more slow going than other species of tetra, which means they’re less likely to stress your gouramis out as well.

They like the same kinds of water conditions as most Gourami’s, so you won’t have to worry about them becoming sick over time.

Lastly, these Tetras need a big group of fish, ideally 8–12 of them, in order to grow and have babies. 

  • pH: near 6.0 – 7.0
  • Temperature: 73 – 84 F 
  • Tank Size: 10 gallons
  • Fish Size: 0.8 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Yoyo Loach

Yoyo Loach Fish Care Sheet

Loaches and gouramis are great tank mates thanks to the fact they inhabit different areas of the tank, and Yoyo loaches are no exception. While they’re known for being playful, they’re not aggressive and they won’t bother the gouramis in your tank.

If you’re going to keep Yoyo loaches with your gouramis, just make sure that they’re getting enough food. It’s best to add sinking algae pellets to the tank to ensure this. Apart from this, they’ll make great tank mates for each other!

  • pH: 6.5-7.5
  • Temperature: 75 – 82°F  
  • Tank Size: 40 gallons
  • Fish Size: 2.5-3 inches
  • Lifespan: 5-8 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Dwarf Pencilfish (Nannostomus marginatus)

Dwarf Pencil Fish Care Sheet

Dwarf Pencilfish stay in the upper and middle levels of the tank and move around in groups of about six, so if you’re planning on keeping them with gourami’s, make sure there are hiding places.

Fortunately, dwarf pencilfish are friendly fish so they’ll get along well with your gouramis and other fish

When it comes to feeding them just make sure you’re giving them food with a good mix of nutrients. Fish flakes are great but you can also give them live food and blanched vegetables from time to time!

  • pH: 5.8 – 7.5
  • Temperature: 75 – 80°F
  • Tank Size: 10 gallons
  • Fish Size: 1.4 inches
  • Lifespan: 3 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Moderate

Chinese Algae Eater

Chinese Algae Eater Care Sheet

Chinese Algae Eaters are perfect tankmates your gourami thanks to how peaceful they are and where they live in the tank.

Chinese Algae Eaters are bottom dwellers who prefer to stay near the substrate, so they won’t bother your gouramis at all, making them great tank mates. They should be given a variety of live or frozen food as well as algae wafers for added nutrition.

It’s important to keep their diet balanced because they can become aggressive if they don’t get enough food. 

  • pH: 6.0 – 8.0
  • Temperature: 74-80°F  
  • Tank Size: 50 gallons
  • Fish Size: 5-7 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Angelfish

angelfish care sheet

Angelfish can be a great option for gouramis under the right conditions! While they’re known for aggression, when you’re keeping them in a big enough tank with lots of hiding places, then they can definitely be housed with more friendly gouramis (like dwarf gouramis).

Feed them a variety of nutritious foods like flakes, frozen or live food, and vegetables. Some great hiding places you should give them include caves or plants to help them to feel safe. 

  • pH: 6.5 – 7.1
  • Temperature: 78 – 84°F  
  • Tank Size: 29 gallons
  • Fish Size: 6 – 8 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Congo Tetra

Congo Tetra Care Sheet

The Congo Tetra is a peaceful, schooling fish that gets along well with gouramis. However, they’re active fish that need to be kept in schools of 6 or more, otherwise, they may become timid or even aggressive.

They thrive in a tank with plenty of plants and hiding places. A varied diet of live or frozen food, flakes, and vegetables will help keep them healthy. Similar to what your gouramis will be eating!

  • pH: 6.0 – 7.5
  • Temperature: 73 – 82°F 
  • Tank Size: 30 gallons
  • Fish Size: 3 inches 
  • Lifespan: 3-5 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Rosy Barb

Rosy Barb Care Sheet

Rosy Barb are an active species and enjoy exploring their environment. Unlike other barbs which are known to be aggressive, rosy barbs are a lot calmer which is why they make great tank mates for your gouramis!

A balanced diet of flakes, frozen or live food, and vegetables will keep them healthy and happy, just like your gouramis! And make sure you provide plenty of hiding places like caves and plants in the tank so they feel secure. And of course, Give them enough space to swim around. 

  • pH: 6 – 8
  • Temperature: 64 – 72 °F 
  • Tank Size: 30 gallons
  • Fish Size: 6 inches  
  • Lifespan: 5 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Tank Mates To Avoid With Gouramis

Not all tank mates will get along with your gourami’s, so it’s important to choose the right ones. Below are five types of fish that you should avoid if you have gouramis in your tank.

Large Cichlids

While a few small species of cichlid can get along with gouramis, larger ones should be avoided. Many large cichlids are aggressive and may bully or even attack the gouramis. If you did plan on adding cichlids, make sure you research thoroughly before doing so.

Smaller Fish

Gourami’s are often territorial, so small or delicate fish may not be safe. If you do keep fish in your tank which are too small, then your gouramis may end up harassing them and bullying them.

Certain Barbs

Many barbs, such as tinfoil barbs and tiger barbs, can be aggressive towards other fish. While some may not bother the gouramis, choose which barbs you add carefully to prevent any potential fights.

Some Loaches

Some loaches can be territorial and can make the gouramis feel threatened. Examples are clown loaches, which should be avoided if you have gouramis in the tank. If you do plan on adding loaches to the tank, stick to the more peaceful ones.

Bettas

Bettas and gouramis are too similar in temperament, swimming space, and in some ways appearance to live together. Both are brightly colored fish that can be aggressive towards other brightly colored fish so pick gouramis carefully if you already have a betta!

Shrimp

In a lot of cases your gouramis are going to see your shrimp as a snack and may try to eat them. If you did want to add shrimp to your tank, you should keep it as heavily planted as possible. However, even then there’s no guarantee your gouramis won’t try to eat them.

Snails

Lastly, gouramis are known for eating snails, so if you wanted to keep them in your tank, stick to snails that are going to breed, so you don’t have to worry about replacing them again and again.

Gourami Tank Mates_ 31 Top Choices & What To Look For

What Are The Best Tank Mates For Dwarf Gouramis?

Because dwarf gourami’s are so peaceful, there are a number of different tank mates you can keep with them. Some of the best tank mates to keep with them include:

  • Corydoras Catfish
  • Neon Tetras
  • Guppies
  • Harlequin Rasboras
  • Platies
  • Siamese Algae Eaters
  • Otocinclus Catfish
  • Zebra Danios

What Are The Best Tank Mates For Blue Gourami’s?

All gouramis are different in temperament, and while blue gouramis are generally peaceful, they can be aggressive at times. With this in mind, some of the best tank mates for them include:

  • Neon Tetras
  • Zebra Loaches
  • Corydoras Catfish
  • Harlequin Rasboras
  • Mollis
  • Pleco’s
  • Platies

What Are The Best Tank Mates For Honey Gouramis?

Next up, honey gouramis. If you’re wondering which fish you should add to your tank with honey gouramis, then try the following:

  • Corydoras catfish
  • Zebra Loaches
  • Glowlight Tetra
  • Harlequin Rasbora
  • Bristlenose Pleco
  • Swordtail 
  • Otocinclus Catfish
  • Pygmy Corydoras

What Are The Best Tank Mates For Opaline Gourami’s?

Because older male opaline gourami’s can be aggressive at times, you should make sure you’re picking tank mates for them carefully. Some tank mates to consider include:

  • Cherry Barb
  • Neon Tetra
  • Bristlenose Pleco
  • Dwarf Neon Rainbowfish
  • Kuhli Loaches
  • Hillstream Loaches

What Are The Best Tank Mates For Three Spot Gouramis

Next up, three spot gouramis, if you’re wondering which tank mates you can keep with them, then try any of the following:

  • Corydoras Catfish
  • Bristlenose Pleco
  • Neon Tetras
  • Green Neon Tetra
  • Rummy Nose Tetra

What Are The Best Tank Mates For Pearl Gouramis?

If you want to add tank mates to your tank with your pearl gouramis, then try any of the following:

  • Glowlight Tetra
  • Kuhli Loach 
  • Neon Tetra
  • Panda Corydoras
  • Cory Catfish
  • Ember Tetra
  • Harlequin Rasboras
  • Dwarf Gourami
  • Otocinclus Catfish
  • Cherry Barbs
  • Bristlenose Pleco

What Are The Best Tank Mates For Sparkling Gouramis?

If you’re keeping sparkling gouramis, then try keeping the following tank mates in the tank with them:

  • Cory Catfish
  • Dwarf Gourami
  • Pearl Gourami
  • Neon Tetras
  • Ember Tetras
  • Yoyo Loach
  • Harlequin Rasboras
  • Dwarf Pencilfish
  • Otocinclus

What Are The Best Tank Mates For Kissing Gouramis?

Kissing gouramis are one of the more aggressive gourami species, with that in mind you need to be extra careful with the tank mates you keep in the tank with them.

With that being said, some tank mates you can consider include:

  • Swordtails
  • Yoyo Loach
  • Chinese Algae Eater
  • Congo Tetra
  • Rosy Barb
  • Harlequin Rasbora

FAQ

Here are some frequently asked questions people have about keeping their gouramis with tank mates!

Can You Keep Gouramis With Guppies?

Gourami’s and guppies make great tank mates because of how peaceful guppies are. They have similar temperaments and get along well with other peaceful fish. Plus, the bright colors of guppies will bring out the colors of your gouramis. 

Can You Keep Gouramis With Tetras?

You can keep gouramis with tetras. Tetras come in various sizes and colors, making them an exciting addition to any tank. They are peaceful fish and will get along great with gouramis with similar temperament. 

When your picking tetras for your gouramis, just make sure you’re avoiding fin nipping species.

Can You Keep Gouramis With Angelfish?

Many fish keepers keep Angelfish and Gourami species harmoniously in the same fish tank. Dwarf Gouramis make great companions for Angelfish due to their shared habitat preferences. 

Can You Keep A Single Gourami?

You should never keep a single gourami. They are social fish that do much better in groups. If you’re not sure you have enough space I’d avoid getting them altogether, or at least keep a pair in a densely planted tank.

Can Blue Gouramis Live Alone?

You should avoid keeping blue gouramis alone like any other kind of gourami. Gouramis are social fish who will become stressed out when they’re not kept with their own species.

What Is The Least Aggressive Gourami?

The least aggressive Gourami is the Dwarf Gourami. This fish is very peaceful and can be kept with other small, non-aggressive fish, such as tetras and guppies. Additionally, Dwarf Gouramis come in various colors, making them an exciting and beautiful addition to any tank.

Recap

Choosing tank mates for gouramis can be tricky. Still, with proper knowledge, creating a harmonious and peaceful community tank is possible. Don’t forget to consider the specific needs of different types of gouramis, such as dwarf, blue, honey, opaline, three-spot, pearl, sparkling, and kissing gouramis. And you can create the perfect tank environment for your beloved fish! 

About the author

Hey! I'm Antonio!

Betta fish keeper for over 6 years now! Since owning a betta I've also housed all kinds of tropical fish, and have seen all manner of problems and how to look after them!

If you need any advice you can always message me or better yet join the Facebook group where a community can answer your questions!