Algae Eaters For Your Fish Tank: Top 29 With Care Guides

Betta ebook-ban

Last Updated on 2023-08-05

The best algae eaters can help keep your aquarium clean and healthy. Algae are a type of bacteria that can grow in freshwater tanks. While some algae are harmless, others can cause problems for your fish. They are also capable of preventing light, which is essential for fish to be able to see.

If you have a problem with algae in your aquarium, you may want to consider getting some algae eaters. In this article,  we shall cover the best algae eaters for your aquarium, taking into account their size, habitat, and the type of algae you are dealing with.

Table of Contents

What Are The Different Types Of Algae Eaters?

When it comes to choosing algae eaters for your tank, there are three main ones you’re going to choose from. Snails, shrimp, or fish. Snails tend to eat green spot algae (the kind that grows on glass) whereas shrimp are more prone to eat hair algae.

Depending on the fish you get, they may eat either. For example suckermouth fish like otocinclus’ prefer green spot algae whereas fish like platies or barbs tend to eat other forms of algae more.

With that being said, here are the best algae eating fish for your tank! Keep reading to find out the best snails and shrimp too!

NamepHTempSizeLifespan
Otocinclus Catfish6.0-7.573-81°F2″5 Years
Siamese Algae Eater6.5-8.075-79°F6″10 Years
Bristlenose Pleco6.5-7.570-80°F 5″10-15 Years
Mollies7.5-8.571-82°F 5″3-5 Years
Hillstream Loach6.5-7.565-80°F 3″8-10 Years
Twig Catfish6.0-7.072-79°F 5-7″10-12 Years
Rubber-Lipped Pleco6.5-7.570-78°F7″10-12 Years
Panda Garra6.5-7.570-77°F4″6 Years
American Flagfish7.0-8.064-72°F2.4″6 Years
Gray Bichir6.0-8.074-82°F18″3-5 Years
Clown Pleco6.8-7.673-82°F3-4″10-12 Years
Bronze Corydoras6.0-8.068-82°F2.5″10 Years
Pygmy Corydoras6.0-8.072-79°F1″3 Years
Dwarf Gourami6.0-7.572-82°F2-3″3-5 Years
Rosy Barb6.0-8.064-72°F3-4″5 Years
Cherry Barb6.0-8.073-81°F2″5-7 Years
Swordtails7.0-8.072-79°F5.5″3-5 Years
Doctor Fish6.0-8.059-83°F4-5″6 Years

Best Fish That Eat Algae

There are so many great fish too choose from, when it comes to algae eaters! While most of these fish do well in tropical tanks, some of them also do well in colder tanks as well! So you really have a wide variety of choice.

Otocinclus Catfish (Macrotocinclus affinis)

Otocinclus catfish are also known as “dwarf suckermouths” thanks to the fact they only grow to about 2 inches long. And since they are thin, they can get into places where other algae-eaters can’t. On top of this, their mouths are great for eating diatom algae from flat surfaces like aquarium glass or plant leaves.

  • pH: 6.0-7.5
  • Temperature: 73-81°F
  • Tank size: 20 gallons or larger
  • Fish size: 1-2 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 years
  • Difficulty keeping: Easy 

Siamese Algae Eater (Crossocheilus oblongus)

siamese algae eater care sheet

Siamese Algae eater’s grow to about 6 inches long so you’ll need to keep them in large aquariums (at least 30 gallons). They have turned down mouths, and they love to eat hair algae, black beard algae, as well as whatever they can forage from the tank.

They can be territorial with their own species or species that look like them, so if you plan on keeping them you’ll either need to keep them on their own, or in groups of 5 or more to reduce aggression .

  • pH: 6.5-8.0
  • Temperature: 75-79°F
  • Tank size: 30 gallons or larger
  • Fish size: 6″
  • Lifespan: 10 years
  • Difficulty keeping: Easy 

Bristlenose Pleco (Ancistrus cirrhosus)

bristlenose pleco care sheet

Bristlenose plecos are peaceful catfish that only grow to about 4 to 5 inches long, which makes them perfect for a 30-gallon tank or larger.

Their suckermouths are made for eating algae, cleaning up old food, and keeping driftwood clean. They are, however, are nocturnal, so they will be the most active at night. This means if you’re looking for an active day time eater, they might not be best for you.

  • pH:6.5-7.5
  • Temperature: 70-80°F
  • Tank Size: 30 gallons or larger
  • Fish Size: up to 5 inches
  • Lifespan: up to 10-15 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Mollies (Poecilia sphenops)

molly fish care sheet

Mollies’ jaws are flat, and their stomachs don’t have a bottom, so they often eat algae off of plants, hardscapes, and flat surfaces. On top of this hey can have a lot of babies if there is enough food and places for the fry to hide, so you’ll never run out of algae eaters.

If you want to keep mollies in your tank make sure you’re keeping them in groups of 2 to 3 female for every 1 male.

  • pH: 7.5-8.5
  • Temperature: 71-82°F
  • Tank Size: 20 gallons
  • Fish Size: up to 4-5 inches
  • Lifespan: up to 3-5 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Hillstream Loach (Sewellia lineolata)

Hillstream Loach Care Sheet

If you’re looking for one of the most unusual algae eaters for your tank, then hillstream loaches are going to be a great choice. With their strong grip, they can clean vertical tank walls, rocks, and large plant leaves. They clean diatoms and flat algae like a window cleaner does.

If you do want to keep Hillstream loaches just make sure that your tank is big enough, and that it has a strong current. Hillstream loaches need extremely well oxygenated tanks, and a strong current to be happy, without this they will suffer.

Lastly, hillstream loaches do well in both colder aquariums, and more tropical aquariums.

  • pH:6.5-7.5
  • Temperature: 65-80°F
  • Tank Size: 50 gallons or larger
  • Fish Size: up to 3 inches
  • Lifespan: 8-10 Years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Moderate

Twig/Farlowella Catfish (Farlowella acus)

Twig Catfish Care Sheet

Twig catfish originates from South America and can grow between 5-7 inches in length. They are shy fish that like to hide, so a tank with plants and bogwood is going to be beneficial. They’re also sensitive to changes in the water, so don’t make big water changes, if you’re keeping them in the tank.

Twig catfish are one of the best aquarium fish for eating algae, and they are slowly becoming more common. They eat many different kinds of food and get rid of green algae quickly. However, this type of fish is one that needs the most care.

  • pH:6.0-7.0
  • Temperature: 65-80°F
  • Tank Size: 35 to 40 gallons or larger
  • Fish Size: up to 5-7 inches
  • Lifespan: 10-12 Years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Moderate

Rubber-Lipped Pleco (Chaetostoma milesi)

A rubber-lipped pleco is one of the best algae-eaters that gets get rid of hair algae. This is one of the few small species of pleco that will eat all kinds of freshwater algae, even the bad ones like black algae and brown diatoms.

  • pH: 6.5-7.5
  • Temperature: 70-78°F
  • Tank Size: 25to 30 gallons or larger
  • Fish Size: up to 7 inches
  • Lifespan: 10-12 Years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Moderate

Panda Garra (Garra flavatra)

Panda Garra Care Sheet

The Panda Garra is another excellent choice for eating hair algae. While they’re not the biggest fish, they’re great at eating algae and biofilm in the tank. They also don’t eat plants, so you don’t have to worry about them damaging your aquarium.

Make sure if you plan on adding them to your tank, that the tank is well oxygenated and has high water flow which they’re going to love!

  • pH: 6.5-7.5
  • Temperature: 70-77°F
  • Tank Size: 20 gallons or larger
  • Fish Size: up to 4 inches
  • Lifespan: 6 Years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Moderate

American Flagfish (Jordanella floridae)

american flagfish care sheet

The American flagfish is a great choice for eating hair algae in larger tanks. They are very effective at getting rid of algae, but they can also be a bit aggressive, so be sure to add other fish that can hold their own.

However, if you want to reduce the chance of aggression occurring, make sure you’re keeping them in groups of 5 or more and keep the tank well planted

  • pH: 7.0-8.0
  • Temperature: 64-72°F
  • Tank Size: 20 gallons or larger
  • Fish Size: up to 2.4 inches
  • Lifespan: 6 Years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Moderate

Senegal/Gray Bichir (Polypterus senegalus)

Senegal Bichir Care Sheet

The Senegal bichir is a great choice for eating algae, however, if they do particularly well in African cichlid tanks, unlike other algae eaters. However, they grow up to 18″ in length, so make sure you’re not putting them with small fish or shrimp which they will eat.

If you do want to keep them in the tank, make sure it’s covered securely so they can’t escape. On top of this, provide plenty of hiding spaces. And while it is possible to keep more than one in a tank, because of their large size, it isn’t recommended.

  • pH: 6.0-8.0
  • Temperature: 74-82°F
  • Tank Size: 90 gallons or larger
  • Fish Size: up to 18 inches
  • Lifespan: 3-5 Years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Hard

Clown Pleco (Panaque Maccus)

clown pleco care sheet

Clown plecos are another great algae eating machine. They do well in 20 gallon tanks, and get along well with most fish thanks to their calm demeanour and because they don’t grow overly big. They will eat all kinds of algae, including hair algae, so if you want an allrounder, they’re a great choice.

If you’re going to keep them in a tank, make sure you’re adding hiding places and lots of plants for them to really keep them happy.

  • pH: 6.8-7.6
  • Temperature: 73-82°F
  • Tank Size: 20 gallons or larger
  • Fish Size: up to 3-4 inches
  • Lifespan: 10-12 Years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Common/Bronze Corydoras (Corydoras Aeneus)

bronze/common corydoras care sheet

The Common Corydoras may not be the best algae eater, but they do eat algae, and they make great tank mates. They’re also hardy fish, and as long as you’re giving them a nice soft substrate, they will do well in pretty much any tank!

  • pH: 6.0-8.0
  • Temperature: 68-82°F
  • Tank Size: 10 gallons or larger
  • Fish Size: up to 2.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 Years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Pygmy Corydoras (Corydoras pygmaeus)

pygmy corydoras care sheet

If you need something smaller than a common cory, then pygmy corydoras are also a great choice! They’re like common cory’s in their behavior and eating requirements, only smaller! They do well in 10 gallon tanks or larger, and make sure you’re keeping them in groups of 5 or more.

  • pH: 6.0-8.0
  • Temperature: 72-79°F
  • Tank Size: 10 gallons or larger
  • Fish Size: up to 1 inch
  • Lifespan: 3 Years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Dwarf Gourami (Trichogaster lalius)

Dwarf Gourami Care Sheet

Dwarf gouramis are one of the most popular algae-eating aquarium fish that don’t grow too big, making them perfect for smaller tanks. They come in a range of colors, including blue, orange, and red. They do best in groups of four or more and prefer planted tanks with lots of hiding places. 

  • pH: 6.0-7.5
  • Temperature: 72-82°F
  • Tank Size: 10 gallons or larger
  • Fish Size: 2-3 inches
  • Lifespan: 3-5 Years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Rosy Barb (Pethia conchonius)

Rosy Barb Care Sheet

Rosy barbs are a native of South Asia and also an excellent choice for controlling algae in your aquarium (especially hair algae). However, rosy barbs are also known to eat plants, so be careful about adding them to your tank.

Fortunately, rosy barbs are also great community fish, so you can keep them with things like swordtails, other barbs, danios, tetras, gouramis, and cory’s.

One thing to note about rosy barbs is that while they can grow up to 6″ in the wild, they are only like to grow to about 3-4″ in captivity.

  • pH: 6.0-8.0
  • Temperature: 64-72°F
  • Tank Size: 30 gallons or larger
  • Fish Size: 6 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 Years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Cherry Barb (Puntius titteya)

Cherry Barb Care Sheet

Cherry barbs are small, hardy fish that are ideal for beginners. They grow to be about two inches long and eat algae, as well as mosquito larvae and other small insects. They do best in schools of six or more and prefer a planted tank with plenty of hiding places.

  • pH: 6.0-8.0
  • Temperature: 73-81°F
  • Tank Size: 30 gallons or larger
  • Fish Size: 2 inches
  • Lifespan: 4 Years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Swordtails (Xiphophorus hellerii)

Swordtail Care Sheet

Swordtails love to eat algae, but it’s best to give them plant food and flake food as well. Just be warned they’re also known to eat live plants too. So, if you have swordtails in your tank, be sure to give them plenty of food to avoid this happening.

While some people keep swordtails alone, it’s best to keep them in a school of 4-5 for maximum happiness.

  • pH: 7.0-8.0
  • Temperature: 72-79°F
  • Tank Size: 20 gallons or larger
  • Fish Size: 5.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 3-5 Years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Doctor Fish (Garra Rufa)

Doctor Fish Care Sheet

Doctor fish are another great algae eater, which do particularly well in colder water, which make them great algae eaters for goldfish tanks. Make sure you’re keeping them in tanks that are well oxygenated with a well filtered aquarium for there health.

Apart from this Doctor fish, that can survive in a variety of conditions, which makes them great for beginners. Just ensure you’re keeping the water parameters stable for them.

  • pH: 6.0-8.0
  • Temperature: 59-83°F
  • Tank Size: 30 gallons or larger
  • Fish Size: 4-5 inches
  • Lifespan: 6 Years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Best Snails That Eat Algae

Now you know about the best fish for eating algae in your tank, here are some of the best snails! Just bare in mind, that if snails aren’t getting fed enough, they may also end up eating some of the plants in your tank as well!

Nerite Snails (Nerita)

nerite snail care sheet

Nerite snails are one of the most popular algae-eating animals for aquariums because they do not multiply in freshwater like other snail species. They come in a variety of colors and patterns, and they grow to be about an inch long. These snails are voracious eaters and will consume all types of algae, including green algae, diatoms, and black brush algae.

  • pH: 7.0-8.0
  • Temperature: 72-78°F
  • Tank Size: 5 Gallons
  • Size: 0.75 inches
  • Lifespan: 1-2 Years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Bladder Snails (Physella acuta)

bladder snail care sheet

Bladder snails are small freshwater snails that are great algae eaters. They originate from Africa and can grow up to 1/2 inch in length. Bladder snails are scavengers and will eat just about anything, including algae. 

  • pH: 7.0-8.0
  • Temperature: 64-84°F
  • Tank Size: 5 Gallons
  • Size: 0.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 1 Year
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Ramshorn Snails (Planorbarius corneus)

ramshorn snail care sheet

Ramshorn snails are a common type of snail that lives in water. They are sturdy and can live in aquariums and ponds. They do well in a wide range of temperatures, which makes them perfect tank mates for goldfish.

  • pH: 7.0-8.0
  • Temperature: 70-80°F
  • Tank Size: 5 Gallons
  • Size: 1 inches
  • Lifespan: 1 Year
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Malaysian Trumpet Snails (Melanoides tuberculata)

malaysian trumpet snail care sheet

Malaysian Trumpet snails are the best algae eaters for goldfish tanks for the money. The longest of these cute snails is about an inch long and looks like a spiral unicorn horn. These snails that eat algae like to burrow, which makes them great additions to tanks with soft substrates that need to be turned, like sand.

  • pH: 7.0-8.0
  • Temperature: 70-79°F
  • Tank Size: 5 Gallons
  • Size: 1.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 1Year
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Mystery/Gold Inca Snail (Pomacea bridgesii)

mystery snail care sheet

Mystery snails or gold Inca snails are a type of freshwater snail that is popular in aquariums that also stays small. They are one of the hard-working snails you can find. They will devote their entire life to scouring your aquarium for leftover food and algae. 

  • pH: 7.0-8.0
  • Temperature: 68-82°F
  • Tank Size: 10 gallons or larger
  • Size: 2 inches
  • Lifespan: 1-2 Years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Rabbit Snail (Tylomelania)

Rabbit Snail Care Sheet

The rabbit snail is one of the bigger types of snails that eat algae. It can grow to be 5 inches long. These snails have long, pointy shells, and they come in different shades of yellow and brown. They don’t usually eat live aquarium plants, but it does eat java fern, so keep that in mind.

  • pH: 7.3-8.5
  • Temperature: 70-84°F
  • Tank Size: 30 gallons or larger
  • Size: 3 inches
  • Lifespan: 3 Years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Best Shrimp For Eating Algae

Snails aren’t the only algae-eating invertebrate you can keep in your tank! In fact, there are also plenty of great shrimp species that will happily feed on algae in the tank as well! Some great shrimp to consider include the following.

Red Cherry Shrimp (Neocaridina davidi)

cherry shrimp care sheet

Red cherry shrimp are easy to care for and do well in a variety of different water conditions. They are also one of the few shrimp that can tolerate some brackish water. These little guys will help clean up algae in your planted tank and are also great for eating leftover food.

  • pH: 6.5-8.0
  • Temperature: 72-82°F
  • Tank Size: 5 gallons or larger
  • Size: 1.25 inches
  • Lifespan: 1-2 Years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Ghost Shrimp (Palaemonetes paludosus)

Ghost Shrimp Care Sheet

Ghost shrimp are another great option for 10-gallon tanks. These little guys are very effective at eating algae and do not bother other fish or plants. Ghost shrimp are also known as glass shrimp due to their clear bodies. 

  • pH: 7.0-8.0
  • Temperature: 65-80°F
  • Tank Size: 10 gallons or larger
  • Size: 1.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 3 Years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Amano Shrimp (Caridina multidentata)

amano shrimp care sheet

Amano shrimps work incredibly hard and are both tenacious. So, if you want to clean your 10-gallon tank more quickly and easily, this is what you need. They work just as well for unusual algae like hair algae as they do for normal cleanup. They scan the aquarium to find the algae they can eat.

  • pH: 6.0-7.5
  • Temperature: 65-85°F
  • Tank Size: 10 gallons or larger
  • Fish Size: 2 inches
  • Lifespan: 2-3 Years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Bamboo Shrimp (Atyopsis moluccensis)

Bamboo Shrimp Care Sheet

Bamboo shrimps feed on small organisms in the waters around them. As a result, they may consume microscopic algae that you cannot even see. They will also occasionally eat other plants but are unlikely to intentionally seek for algae to eat.

There are many different types of algae eaters that can be added to a 10-gallon tank. Make careful to pick the right algae eater for your aquarium and to give the fish good water quality and lots of hiding places.

  • pH: 7.0-7.5
  • Temperature: 73-82°F
  • Tank Size: 20 gallons or larger
  • Size: 2-3 inches
  • Lifespan: 1-2 Years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Cardinal Shrimp (Caridina dennerli)

The cardinal shrimp is an unusual addition to this short list of shrimp that eat algae. This creature from Sulawesi is popular because of its beautiful colors, but it is hard to keep because it has very specific needs when it comes to water values. But they will keep the aquarium very clean, and they are also very interesting and different.

Adding shrimp to your aquarium is a great way to control algae growth. Be sure to research the type of shrimp you want to add to your tank, as some may eat other fish or plants.

  • pH: 7.0-8.5
  • Temperature: 77-86°F
  • Tank Size: 5 gallons or larger
  • Size: 1 inch
  • Lifespan: 1-2 Years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Difficult

Which is The Best Algae Eater For Your Tank?

When it comes to stocking your aquarium with algae eaters, there are a few different options to choose from. Two of the most popular choices are plecos and otos. Both of these fish are great at grazing on algae, but they have some notable differences.

Plecos are larger fish that need more space to maneuver, and they also produce a lot of waste. Otocinclus catfish, on the other hand, are much smaller and more efficient eaters. They also don’t produce as much waste, making them a better choice for smaller aquariums. 

Ultimately, the best algae eater for your tank depends on your specific needs and preferences. You should consider the size of your aquarium, the other fish you have, and the type of algae you’re dealing with before making a decision.

Determining which algae eater is best for your tank is an important part of keeping your aquarium clean and clear. And with a little bit of research, you should be able to find the perfect algae eater for your needs.

betta care facebook group

What Are The Best Algae Eaters For Planted Tanks?

When it comes to picking algae eaters for a planted aquariums, generally, shrimp are going to be your best bet, however, there are also some fish and even snails that can do a great job as well!

The best algae eaters for planted tanks are amano shrimp, Siamese algae eaters, otocinclus catfish, bristlenose plecos, twig catfish, cherry shrimp, hillstream loaches, and even nerite snails.

What Are The Best Algae Eaters For 5 Gallon Tanks

Your 5-gallon tank is the perfect size for a wide variety of shrimp and snails, however, it can be harder to find fish that will eat algae in a tank this small, with that being said there are a few you can try,

Nerite snails, cherry shrimp, ghost shrimp, guppies, and Malaysian trumpet snails are going to be the go to algae eaters for 5 gallon tanks. Most of the other algae eaters won’t be happy in a tank this small.

What Are The Best Algae Eaters For 10 Gallon Tanks?

Finding the best algae eaters for a 10 gallon tank isn’t difficult at all! In fact, you may even be limited with the algae eaters you choose. With that in mind though…

The best algae eaters for a 10 gallon tank have to be amano shrimp. As well as this, you can also try adding otocinclus catfish, nerite snails, cherry shrimp, ghost shrimp, bladder snails, American Flagfish, and guppies, and gold spot dwarf plecos.

What Are The Best Algae Eaters For 20 Gallon Tanks

When it comes to algae eaters for a 20 gallon tank you’re a lot more spoilt for choice, along with what you can put in a 10 gallon tank you can also try adding mollies, platies, swordtails, and some species of smaller pleco like dwarf snowball plecos, pitbull plecos and angelicus plecos.

What Are The Best Brown Algae Eaters?

It can be hard to find tank mates that eat brown algae, but if you want to try some of the best choices include otocinclus catfish, amano shrimp, and nerite snails. Even then, the results you get will vary depending on the other food in the tank.

What Are The Best Hair Algae Eaters?

Shrimp are normally the best algae eaters for fish tanks. Amano shrimp are your best choice, however, any species of shrimp is going to take a crack at hair algae. Just don’t expect too much from them. If your fish tank is out of control, they’re not going to be able to get rid of hair algae completely.

What Are The Best Algae Eaters For African Cichlid Tank?

If you need to add an algae eater to your African Cichlids tank, then you need to make sure that you’re adding algae eaters that can handle more aggressive fish. Fortunately, there are options to choose from.

Plecos are going to be the best choice of algae eater for African cichlids because of their large size and armor like skin. They aren’t going to be phased by your cichlids, so they’re your best choice. As well as plecos, you can also try Senegal bichirs as well!

What Are The Best Algae Eaters For A Goldfish Tank

When looking for algae eaters that can live with your goldfish, you need to be choosing ones that are big enough, and can handle colder water conditions. They also need to be peaceful, as although goldfish are big, they’re also gentle giants.

Some of the best tank mates for goldfish include: nerite snails, Japanese trapdoor snails bristlenose plecos, rubber lipped plecos, amano shrimp, hognosed brochis, doctor fish, and platies.

What Are The Best Algae Eaters That Stay Small?

If you’ve already got a few fish in your tank, you might only be looking for algae eaters that stay small. With this in mind, some of the best small algae eaters to add to your tank include pygmy corys, common corys, amano shrimp, cherry shrimp, nerite snails, and otocinclus catfish.

FAQ

Here are some frequently asked questions that people have about algae eaters for their tank!

Will Algae Eaters Clean My Tank?

Algae eaters are going to help keep your tank clean from algae, but they’re not going to help keep the tank clean itself. You’ll still need to perform frequent water changes and make sure you’re vacuuming the gravel and cleaning your filter.

Are Shrimp or Snails Better in a Small Community Tank?

Both shrimp and snails are great for small community tanks, and it’s all personal preference. If you have a planted tank then shrimp are going to be better, whereas if you have some semi aggressive tank mates, then snails will be better.

What Eats Black Beard Algae?

Some of the best algae eaters for eating blackbeard algae include Siamese algae eaters, American flagfish, golden algae eaters, Chinese algae eaters, and flying foxes.

What Eats String Algae?

Common plecos and amano shrimp are some of the best string algae eaters you can buy.

What Eats Diatom Algae?

If you have a diatom algae problem in your tank, then the best things to eat it are snails, shrimp and suckermouth fish, such as various plecos and otocinclus catfish.

What Eats Staghorn Algae?

If you want a fish that eats staghorn algae, then a Siamese algae eater is going to be your best choice, however, you will need a tank that’s at least 30 gallons in size. If your tank isn’t big enough for Siamese algae eaters, then you should try Amano Shrimp instead.

What Snails Eat Hair Algae?

If you want a snail that eats hair algae, then the best choice has to be a nerite snail! Not only will they eat hair algae, they’ll eat all other types of algae as well. Asides from nerite snails you can also try ramshorn and mystery snails as well.

Recap

There are a variety of different types of algae eaters that are well-suited for your fish tanks. The best way to distinguish what worked best for you is to know what your options are and the pros and cons for each one. Algae eaters are beneficial for your tank as they help with keeping the tank clean and provide a good environment for your fish.

From shrimps, snails, and fishes, each has its own unique way of getting rid of algae and other debris in your tank. So, it really depends on your preference on what you want in your tank and what will work better for you. We hope this article has helped you in deciding the best algae eater for your fish tank. Happy fish keeping!

Ultimate Betta Fish Care Guide
About the author

Hey! I'm Nicolas from Iguane Media !

Blogger and Owner of the betta care fish guide
Thanks for reading this blog

I'm an Animal Lover