Neon Tetra Disease (6 Symptoms & How To Treat It)

Neon tetra disease is a serious problem for fishkeepers. It is important to take steps to prevent it from happening in the first place. Many fishkeepers don’t realize that neon tetra disease is a thing until it’s too late and their fish are already sick. Neon tetra disease is a fast-spreading, degenerative disease that affects many different fish species, not just neon tetras. In this article, you’ll learn about the symptoms of neon tetra disease, how to prevent it, and what to do if your fish contract the disease. Read on if you suspect that your fish has this disease.

What Is Neon Tetra Disease?

Neon tetra disease is a degenerative disease that spreads quickly and kills fish. It is caused by parasites. This disease was first found in a species of tetra and got its name from that fish. It affects many tetras and other popular aquarium fish as well. 

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The disease also affects cichlids like angelfish and cyprinids like danios, rasboras, and barbs. Even regular goldfish can get sick. Cardinal tetras are more resistant to the effects of this disease than neon tetras, which look very similar. Most of the time, this happens when a fish eats infected live food or the remains of infected fish that died in the tank. 

When fish get sick, they lose their color, get cysts, and have trouble swimming. If the disease gets worse, they get a severe infection that kills them. There is no known way to treat neon tetra disease, so it is important to avoid it. As the parasite gets worse, neon tetra disease symptoms tend to come on in a certain order. When a fish gets sick, tank owners will likely see the following symptoms:

What Causes Neon Tetra Disease?

A parasite called Pleistophora hyphessobryconis causes neon tetra disease. Spores get into fish when they eat them, usually through one of these two ways. First, fish eat the bodies of infected fish that have died. Then, live food that has this parasite on it is eaten by fish.

Once a fish is sick, the disease can spread to other fish through damaged skin or gills or by passing from parents to offspring through their eggs. Once the spores get into a fish, the parasite will eat the fish from the inside out, starting with the digestive tract and stomach. Sporoplasms grow in the intestines, burrow through the wall of the intestines, and then grow cysts in the skeletal muscles. 

The cysts hurt the tissue, which shows up as a paler color and weaker muscles, among other things. The disease was first seen in neon tetras, so it was named after them. However, it has also been seen in many other fish, such as angelfish, cardinal tetras, goldfish, and cyprinids like danios, rasboras, and barbs (and additional common species can also be infected).

Fighting fish, Siamese fish, in a fish tank decorated with pebbles and trees, Black background.

What Are The Symptoms Of Neon Tetra Disease?

As the parasite gets worse, neon tetra disease symptoms tend to come on in a certain order. When a fish gets sick, tank owners will likely see the following symptoms:

1. Fish is Restless

In the early stages, restlessness, especially at night, may be the only symptom of neon tetra disease. Most of the time, the first sign that something is wrong is that the sick fish no longer swim in schools with the other fish. Eventually, the fish starts swimming in a more erratic way, and it’s clear that it’s not well.

2. Cysts

When the parasite gets into the fish’s muscles, cysts often start to form there. If the body of the fish looks lumpy, this could be a symptom of neon tetra disease.

3. Having Trouble Swimming

Damage to the muscles can cause the spine to curve or change shape, which can make it hard for the fish to swim. Since the muscles are mostly affected, even people who don’t have curved spines can have trouble moving. When the fish has this symptom, it could be a sign of neon tetra disease.

4. The Loss of Color

As the disease gets worse, the muscle tissue that is affected starts to turn white. This usually starts in the color band and along the spine. The pale color gets bigger as more muscle tissue is affected. If this happens to your fish, it could be a symptom of neon tetra disease.

5. Another Infection

Another symptom that the fish could be sick of neon tetra disease is if you notice that the fish developed another infection. It’s not unusual for the body to get bloated or for the fins, especially the tail fin, to rot. But both of these conditions are caused by secondary infections, not by the disease itself.

6. Hiding

When your fish get sick, they will run away and hide in plants or caves. As they try to get their energy back after being sick, they will spend less time with other fish. If you see your fish hiding often, this could be a symptom of neon tetra disease.

7. Fish’s Spine Is Curved

Over time, the muscles and other parts of a sick fish break down. At this point, the straight blue line on your neon tetras will start to curve into a “S.” The tail of the fish will also curve down. If you see you fish’s spine curved down, this could be a symptom of neon tetra disease.

How To Treat Neon Tetra Disease

Unfortunately, fish that have Neon Tetra Disease can’t be treated or given medicine because there isn’t one. The only thing that you can do is to prevent it from spreading. You can do this by separating the infected fish and killing them to stop the disease from spreading.

It is also best to take steps to stop it from happening again. Aquarists can do this by keeping the water quality high and cleaning it often, especially after the first outbreak. Also, when buying fish, you should be very careful to look for the above signs in pet stores before you buy them and bring them home to your aquarium. As a best practice, you can also keep new fish from your aquarium in a quarantine tank for a few weeks before putting them in their new home.

Sick fish should be removed from the main aquarium as soon as possible to prevent the spread of disease. The best way to protect your fish from Neon Tetra Disease is to keep them healthy and stress-free. A happy and healthy fish is much less likely to get sick in the first place. If you think that your fish might be sick, the first thing you should do is to check the water quality. 

How Long Does Neon Tetra Disease Take To Kill?

Neon Tetra Disease can kill your fish in anywhere from two weeks to two months. Fish whose immune systems aren’t as strong are more likely to die from the infection than fish who were healthy before.

In both cases, the outlook is not good. Neon Tetra Disease is not very common, but it is known for being hard to treat. The best outcome is for the disease to stay away from the rest of the fish in the tank.

What Fish Can Get Neon Tetra Disease?

This disease was first found in a species of tetra and got its name from that fish. It affects many tetras and other popular aquarium fish as well. The disease also affects cichlids like angelfish and cyprinids like danios, rasboras, and barbs. Even regular goldfish can get neon tetra disease. 

Cardinal tetras are more resistant to the effects of this disease than neon tetras, which look very similar. This disease is also called black-spot disease or iridovirus, and it’s caused by a virus that infects the cells of the fish. The virus is highly contagious and can be easily spread from one fish to another.

If you suspect that your fish have neon tetra disease, it’s important to take them to the vet as soon as possible. There is no cure for this disease, but there are treatments that can help your fish to feel more comfortable. The most important thing you can do for your fish is to keep their tank clean and free of stress.

Can Guppies Get Neon Tetra Disease?

Neon Tetra Disease isn’t very common, but it can happen to guppies. If you want to increase the chance that a guppy will live, put it in a quarantine tank as soon as it starts to show signs of Neon Tetra Disease.

Neon Tetra disease is caused by a parasite called Microsporidian. It is a degenerative disease. As this disease gets worse, the fish’s organs and tissues change because of changes in the cells. This causes the fish to get worse over time.

Follow the steps mentioned above if you think your guppy has Neon Tetra Disease. We explained what the disease is, what its symptoms are, and how to keep your guppy from getting it.

Can Bettas Get Neon Tetra Disease?

Bettas, also known as Siamese fighting fish, are a popular choice for aquariums and Fish Bowls because of their beautiful fins and coloration. Bettas are also relatively easy to care for, which makes them a good choice for beginner fishkeepers. However, one thing to be aware of if you’re considering keeping bettas is that they are susceptible to Neon Tetra Disease (NTD). 

NTD is caused by a bacterium called Pleurococcus ne HRCria and is deadly to bettas. The disease is most commonly spread through contaminated water, so it’s important to make sure that your betta’s tank is clean and well-maintained. Bettas usually show signs of NTD within two weeks of exposure, so if you notice your betta acting listless or unwell, be sure to take them to the vet for a check-up. While there is no cure for NTD, early diagnosis and treatment can help to improve your betta’s chances of recovery.

Can Mollies Get Neon Tetra Disease?

If you’re a fish enthusiast, you’re probably familiar with neon tetra disease (NTD). This disease is deadly to fish, and it’s characterized by lethargy, refusal to eat, and bloating. NTD is most commonly found in neon tetras, hence the name. However, mollies are also susceptible to this disease. In fact, any fish that’s a member of the Characin family (which includes neon tetras) is at risk. 

So, if you have mollies in your aquarium, it’s important to be on the lookout for signs of NTD. Fortunately, there are some things you can do to help prevent the disease from taking hold. For example, keeping your aquarium clean and maintaining proper water conditions can go a long way toward protecting your fish from NTD and other diseases.

How Long Can A Fish Live With Neon Tetra Disease?

Neon Tetra Disease (NTD) is a devastating illness that affects freshwater fish. The disease is caused by a number of different pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, and viruses. These pathogens attack the fish’s body, leading to severe inflammation and damage to the internal organs. NTD is notoriously difficult to treat and often leads to death within a matter of days or weeks. 

In some cases, however, fish may be able to survive for months or even years after becoming infected. The length of time that a fish can live with NTD will depend on the severity of the infection, the Fish’s overall health, and the availability of treatment. If left untreated, NTD will eventually claim the life of even the hardiest fish. Most fish with this disease are killed before it gets bad enough to hurt them.

How Is Neon Tetra Disease Spread?

Neon tetra disease (NTD) is a highly contagious and often fatal disease that primarily affects neon tetras. The disease is caused by a bacterium called Pleurograssia melanotaenia, and it is thought to be spread through contaminated water. NTD can also be spread through contact with infected fish, meaning that even healthy fish can become carriers of the disease. 

Once a fish is infected, the bacteria quickly multiply, causing symptoms such as loss of coloration, lethargy, and bloating. In severe cases, the fish may develop ulcers and eventually die. There is no known cure for NTD, and infected fish should be removed from the tank immediately to prevent the disease from spreading.

How To Prevent Neon Tetra Disease

Unfortunately, there is no cure for NTD, and it is very contagious. So, the best thing to do is to stop it from happening and stop it from spreading as much as possible. Here are 5 ways you can do to prevent neon tetra disease:

1. Quarantine All New Fish 

Put all of your new fish in a separate container for a few weeks so you can check on their health and keep your other animals from getting sick. Use the quarantine tank to help them get back to normal after a stressful trip from the fish farm. This will help prevent neon tetra disease from spreading among your fish.

2.  Clean Your Tanks 

Keep your fish tanks clean and free of debris. This will help prevent the spread of disease and also make your fish happier and healthier. Clean the gravel, filter, and decor in your tank on a regular basis.

3. Use Fresh Water 

Use only fresh, clean water for your fish tank. This will help prevent the spread of disease and also keep your fish healthy. 

4. Keep Your Fish Well-Fed

A well-fed fish is a happy fish. Keep your fish fed on a regular basis so they stay healthy and strong. A good diet will help them fight off disease.

5. Get Your Fish from A Reputable Source 

Make sure you get your fish from a reputable source. This will help ensure that your fish are healthy and free of disease.

Neon tetra disease is a serious problem for fishkeepers. It is important to take steps to prevent it from happening in the first place. By following these simple tips, you can help keep your fish healthy and happy. 

FAQ

How Long To Quarantine For Possible Neon Tetra Disease?

Keep the fish in the quarantine tank for at least 2 weeks. This will stop diseases like Neon Tetra Disease from spreading, according to Wikihow.

How To Tell If A Cherry Barb Has Neon Tetra Disease

According to Aquarium Coop, Neon Tetra Disease is characterized by a loss of color, body deformities, and twitching. The eyes may also bulge out. These are the symptoms you should watch out for to tell if a cherry barb has neon tetra disease.

Is Neon Tetra Disease Contagious?

Neon Tetra Disease is very contagious because it can be passed from one fish species to another, says The Aquarium Guide. It is very important to put infected fish in quarantine right away and keep the water clean and in good condition so that the ecosystem doesn’t get worse.

Does My Fish Have Neon Tetra Disease Or Columnaris?

If your fish has lost color and is twitching, it’s more likely to have Neon Tetra Disease. If it has fuzzy white patches on its skin, it’s more likely to have Columnaris as stated by  That Pet Place.

Recap

Neon tetra disease is a fast-spreading, degenerative disease that kills fish. Neon tetras were the first fish to get this disease, so it was named after them. But it has been seen in a lot of other fish, like angelfish and cardinal tetras. Neon tetra disease could be the cause of a sick fish. The parasite can bend the fish’s spine, making it hard for it to swim. It can also make the body swell up and cause the fins to rot, especially the tail fin. Your fish can die from Neon Tetra Disease in anywhere from two weeks to two months. There is no cure for NTD, but if you find it and treat it quickly, your fish has a better chance of getting better. NTD can’t be cured but it can be prevented.