6 Reasons Your Guppy Is Laying On The Bottom Of The Tank

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Last Updated on 2023-08-31

For people just starting out with their fish care journey, finding their guppy at the bottom of the tank can be really confusing. Guppy fish might be at the bottom of the tank for many reasons, from aquarium problems to pregnancy. To help you figure out why your guppies are lying at the bottom of the aquarium, we listed all the possible reasons this usually happens.

Why Is My Guppy At The Bottom Of The Tank?

So, why do guppy fish stay at the bottom of the tank, and what can you do about it? Here are some of the most common reasons:

1. Pregnancy or in Labor

If you see a female guppy fish at the bottom of the aquarium, it could be because she is pregnant and giving birth. If you keep both male and female guppies, they’ll likely have babies, and the female will give birth. The female guppy fish is getting ready to give birth if she has a big belly and seems to be looking for quiet places in the aquarium.

2. Stress

Stress can be another reason your guppy fish may hang out at the aquarium’s bottom. Many things can stress out your fish, like a noisy tank, too much handling (like moving them from one tank to another), or a tank that isn’t well taken care of. Guppy fish can also become stressed if other fish chase or hurt them. 

3. Poor Water Quality

Poor water quality is one of the main stressors that can cause guppies to act differently. They may become sluggish, lose their appetite, show signs of illness and stay at the bottom. When you get a new aquarium — and this is true for any fish you want to keep — you must cycle it first. After that, you can put your fish one by one. 

4. Bad Tank Mates

Even though they might like the same range of water conditions, some fish just don’t get along. This can lead to aggression, territorial behavior, fights, and injuries. Putting guppies in the same tank as fish they don’t get along with is also very stressful for the fish. This can lead to them staying at the bottom of the tank.

5. Disease

If your guppy fish is sick, it might lie still on the bottom or have trouble swimming or breathing. Many diseases, like swim bladder disorder, dropsy, parasitic infections, bacterial infections, etc., can cause this behavior or make swimming hard. Look for other symptoms of diseases, such as spots or sores on the body, ragged fins, or loss of appetite.

6.  Lack of Oxygen

Guppies are constantly moving. They swim and hunt for food as they chug along the water’s surface. But if their tank doesn’t have enough oxygen, your guppies will look for places with more oxygen. Since the lower parts of your tank are rich in oxygen, so you might find your guppy staying there. 

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What To Do If Your Guppy Is At The Bottom Of The Tank

If your guppy stays at the bottom of the tank and doesn’t move, you can fix the problem by doing the following:

1. Measure Tanks Water Parameters

You should measure your water parameters as one of the first things you do. Use a reliable test kit to measure pH, ammonia, nitrites, and nitrates. Make sure they’re all at the correct levels.

2. Make Changes To The Temperature

Guppies prefer water temperatures between 74-82°F. Test your tank’s temperature and make adjustments to stay within this range.

3. Check If The Tank Is Overcrowded

Guppies need plenty of swimming space to stay healthy. If your tank is overcrowded, consider transferring some fish to another tank.

4. Check If There Is Enough Oxygen

Guppies need plenty of oxygen to stay healthy and active. Ensure the water has enough aeration and turbulence, or add a small air stone to increase oxygen levels.

5. Offer A Variety Of Food

Guppies need a varied diet to stay healthy. Offer a mix of live, frozen, and flake foods to give your guppy all the nutrients it needs.

6. Make Sure There Are Plenty Of Hiding Places

Guppies feel more secure if they have places where they can hide when feeling scared or stressed. Add some rocks, plants, and driftwood to the tank for them to hide in.

7. Check For Disease

If none of the above measures work, you should check your guppy for signs of illness, such as discoloration, lethargy, or fin rot. If your fish is sick, consult your vet for the best treatment. 

Are Guppies Naturally Bottom Dwellers?

Guppies are not naturally bottom dwellers; however, they can be trained to do so if provided with the right environment. Guppies can live in various habitats on the surface, mid-water, and bottom. 

In the tank, guppies usually eat from the top. Most of the time, they swim just under the water’s surface. But guppies are known to eat wherever they can find food. They will eat from anywhere in the tank if there is food there. But that doesn’t change the fact that guppies feed on the top of the water. 

But one thing you should know about guppies is that it’s easy to teach them to do things. For example, if your guppy eats from the bottom, it’s probably because you’ve taught it to do so. However, it’s hard to say how your fish could have learned to act that way.

Female Guppy Laying On the Bottom Of Tank

Female guppies are known to lay on the bottom of aquariums for a few reasons. One is that they might be tired from laying eggs, as this process can take a toll on them. Female guppies may lie at the bottom of the tank when they are ready to give birth.

Another reason why female guppies might lie at the bottom of tanks is because they’re looking for a place to hide. Female guppies may be scared or stressed and are looking for a place to feel safe. It’s essential to provide your guppy tank with plenty of hiding places to help them feel secure.

Finally, female guppies may lie on the bottom if they feel weak or ill. If your female guppy is lying at the bottom, check for signs of illness such as discoloration, lethargy, or fin rot. If you think your guppy is sick, you should call your vet to find out how to treat it best.  

Male Guppy Staying At Bottom Of Tank

Male guppies may stay at the bottom of tanks for a few reasons. One is that they might be scared or stressed and looking for a place to feel safe. Ensure your tank has plenty of hiding places so your male guppy can find one when feeling scared or stressed.

Another reason why male guppies may stay at the bottom is that they’re looking for food. Male guppies are known to be more active than females, so they may be exploring the bottom of the tank for food. Offer a variety of foods to ensure that your male guppy gets all the nutrients it needs.

Finally, male guppies may stay at the bottom if they feel weak or ill. Check for signs of illness such as discoloration, lethargy, or fin rot. If you think your guppy is sick, consult your vet to find out how to treat it best.  

Why Is There A Bloated Guppy At the Bottom Of the Tank?

If you have a bloated guppy at the bottom of your tank, it could be due to several reasons. One is that the fish is suffering from constipation. Overfeeding or consuming the wrong food can cause constipation in guppies, and a bloated fish is one of the symptoms.

Another reason why your guppy might be bloated is that it has a swim bladder infection or disorder. This condition can cause the fish to be unable to control its buoyancy, sinking to the bottom of the tank. If you think your guppy may have a swim bladder infection, consult your vet to get the best treatment.

Finally, a bloated guppy at the bottom of the tank could be caused by dropsy, an infectious disease that causes the fish to swell. If your guppy has dropsy, it’s essential to act quickly and consult a vet for treatment. 

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Why Is Your Guppy Sitting On the Bottom Of Tank Gasping?

If your guppy is sitting at the bottom of the tank and gasping, it could be due to several reasons. One is that the water in the tank is not properly oxygenated. As mentioned, guppies need plenty of oxygen to survive, so ensure the water is well-aerated.

Another reason your guppy might be gasping is that the water temperature in the tank is too high. Guppies need cool temperatures to stay healthy, so ensure the tank temperature is between 72°F-82°F.

Finally, your guppy may gasp if it feels stressed or scared. Make sure that there are plenty of hiding places for your guppy in the tank, and if the stress persists, consult your vet for further advice. It’s also possible that your guppy is gasping due to a respiratory infection or illness, so monitoring its health is vital.

FAQ

Pregnant Guppy Laying On the Bottom Of Tank

Pregnant guppies stay at the bottom of the tank. If your guppy spends a lot of time at the bottom of the tank or swimming close to the bottom, this could mean that she is pregnant. But you should also look for other signs of pregnancy to make sure they are not sick but only pregnant.

Guppy Staying In One Spot At the Bottom Of the Tank

If your guppy stays in one spot at the bottom of the tank, it could be sick.  Check for signs of illness such as discoloration, fin rot, or other physical changes. 

Guppy At The Bottom Of The Tank After Water Change

If your guppy is at the bottom of the tank after a water change, it could be due to the changes in the water temperature and chemistry. Ensure the water temperature was not lowered too much or that the pH balance wasn’t drastically changed. 

Why Is Your New Guppy At The Bottom Of The Tank

Due to stress or fear, new guppies may stay at the bottom of the tank. Ensure your tank has plenty of hiding places and the water is adequately oxygenated. If the fish still seems stressed, consult your vet for further advice. 

Recap

It is not uncommon for guppies to be found at the bottom of the tank. However, if your guppy remains at the bottom for an extended period, this may cause concern. Female guppies on the bottom of the tank could indicate they are ready to give birth or have already given birth. Male guppies may stay at the bottom of the tank if they feel threatened by other fish. We hope to have provided more knowledge on why your guppy may be at the bottom of the tank.

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