Types Of Tetra: Top 41 Species With Care Sheets

Are you a fan of vibrant and lively fish in your aquarium? If so, then you’re in for a treat! In this article, we’ll be diving into the world of tetras and exploring the various types that are perfect for any aquarist. From the classic neon tetra to the lesser-known emperor tetra, get ready to discover a whole new world of colorful aquatic companions.

In this article, we’ll take a look at the different types of tetra and provide you with all the information you need to know to care for them in your aquarium. So, keep reading!

Table of Contents

The 41 Best Types Of Tetra For Your Aquarium

Here’s a closer look at some of the most popular types of tetras and what makes each one special. Remember, when you’re keeping different types of tetra fish together, you may even notice them start schooling together as well!

NamepHTempSizeLifespan
Emperor Tetra5.0-7.573-81°F 2-3″5-8 Years
Ember Tetra6.0-7.073-84°F 0.8″2-3 Years
X-Ray/Pristella Tetra6.0-7.572-82°F 1.75″4-5 Years
Rummy Nose Tetra5.5-6.572-84°F 2″5-6 Years
Crystal Tetras 6.0-7.572-79°F1.5″3-5 Years
Bleeding Heart Tetra 5.5-7.072-80°F 2-3″3-5 Years
Black Skirt Tetra 6.0-7.570-85°F3″3-5 Years
White Skirt Tetra5.8-8.5 70-90°F2″5 Years
Black Phantom Tetra 6.0-7.572-82°F1.75″5 Years
Redeye Tetra 5.5-8.073-82°F2.75″5 Years
Buenos Aires Tetra 5.8-8.564-82°F2.75″5 Years
Congo Tetra 6.0-7.573-82°F3″3-5 Years
Ruby Tetra5.0-7.068-82°F1.6″5-10 Years
Blue Tetra 5.5-7.072-78°F2″2-4 Years
Colombian Tetra 5.5-7.075-82°F3″3-5 Years
Neon Tetra 4.0-7.572-78°F1.5″ 5-8 Years
Cardinal Tetra 5.3-7.873-81°F2″ 5 Years
Black Neon Tetra 5.0-7.573-81°F1.5″5 Years
Green Neon Tetra5.0-6.575-84°F1.5″2-3 Years
Green Fire Tetra 6.5-7.072-80°F2″3-6 Years
Candy Cane Tetra 6.6-7.873-82°F3″3-5 Years
Rosy Tetra 5.5-7.575-82°F2.5″3-5 Years
Toucan Tetra4.0-7.068-74°F 0.75″5-7 Years
Diamond Tetra 5.5-7.572-82°F2″3-6 Years
Bloodfin Tetra 6.0-8.064-82°F2″5-8 Years
Penguin Tetra 6.0-8.072-82°F3″3-5 Years
Flame Tetra 5.5-7.572-82°F1.6″3-5 Years
Silvertip Tetra 6.0-8.072–82°F1.2″5-8 Years
Lemon Tetra 6.0-8.072-82°F2″6-8 Years
GloFish® Tetra6.0-7.072-82°F1.5″3-5 Years
Glowlight Tetra 5.8-7.574-82°F1.5″5 Years
Loreto Tetra 5.5-7.072-78°F1″5-7 Years
Long-Finned Tetra 5.8-8.570-79°F2″6-7 Years
Red-Base Tetra 6.2-7.273-79°F1.7″5-8 Years
Serpae Tetra 5.0-7.872-79°F1.75″5 Years
Red Phantom Tetra 6.0-7.568-73°F1.5″5 Years
Bucktooth Tetra 5.0-7.572-82°F5″10 Years
Blind Cave Tetra 6.5-8.068-77°F5″3-5 Years
Flag Tetra5.5-7.573-82°F 2″5-7 Years
Panda Tetra5.5-7.572-82°F2″5 Years
Rainbow Tetra6.0-7.272-80°F1.5″3-5 Years
Types Of Tetra infographic

Emperor Tetra (Nematobrycon Palmeri)

Emperor Tetra Care Sheet

Emperor Tetras love their homes to feel like the rivers of Colombia – think lots of plants and dim lighting. If you’re going for the best set-up for them to thrive, you’ll want a tank with moderately hard water, dark substrate and plenty of greenery to bring out their stunning colors. 

As for food, Emperor Tetras are pretty easygoing. They’ll happily chow down on flakes, freeze-dried foods, and frozen foods, but they would love to be fed with live bites like daphnia, mosquito larvae, and brine shrimp.

  • pH: 5.0-7.5
  • Temperature: 73-81°F 
  • Tank size: 20 gallons or larger
  • Fish size: up to 2-3 inches
  • Lifespan: 5-8 years
  • Difficulty keeping: Moderate

Ember Tetras (Hyphessobrycon Amandae)

Ember Tetra Care Sheet

Ember Tetras are found in slow-moving or stagnant waters with lots of plants, such 

as small streams or swamps. These playful little fish love soft, slightly acidic water and thrive in heavily planted tanks with plenty of places to hide and explore.

Ember Tetras are omnivores, meaning they need a mixed diet of meat and veggies. Pellets work great and are better than flake foods, which lose nutrients quickly. You can also mix it up with the occasional frozen treat.

  • pH:  6.0 to 7.0
  • Temperature: 73-84°F 
  • Tank size: 10 gallons or larger
  • Fish size: 0.8 inches
  • Lifespan: 2-3 years
  • Difficulty keeping: Easy

Pristella Tetra or X-Ray Tetra (Pristella Maxillaris)

x ray/pristella care sheet

X-ray Tetras are unique-looking fish known for their scales’ translucency, enabling you to see their internal structures upon closer look. Having them will surely add a visual interest in your tank. Just make sure to add at least 6 of them because they are schooling fish who love to swim together.

Pristella Tetras are generally easy to care for and are suitable for beginner aquarists. In their natural habitat, Pristella Tetras are found in clear, slow-moving streams and rivers. To replicate their natural habitat, it’s recommended to provide them with a well-planted tank with plenty of hiding places and open swimming areas. 

  • pH: 6.0-7.5
  • Temperature: 72-82°F 
  • Tank size: 15-20 gallons or larger
  • Fish size: 1.75 inches 
  • Lifespan: 4-5 years
  • Difficulty keeping: Easy

Rummy Nose Tetra (Hemigrammus Rhodostomus)

Rummy Nose Tetra Care Sheet

Rummy Nose Tetras will surely stand out in the aquarium world thanks to their bright red nose and silver body. They’re originally from the Amazon Basin in South America, but they’ve become pretty popular with fish enthusiasts around the world.

They also like to have a lot of plants and hiding spots in their tank, so make sure to set up a cozy little habitat for them. As for food, they’re not too picky and will eat just about anything you give them – flakes, pellets, frozen foods, you name it. 

  • pH: 5.5-6.5
  • Temperature: 72-84°F 
  • Tank size: 20 gallons or larger
  • Fish size: 2 inches 
  • Lifespan: 5-6 years
  • Difficulty keeping: Moderate

Crystal Tetras ( Protocheirodon pi)

crystal tetra care sheet

Crystal tetras are a relatively new type of tetra that was discovered in 1978 but reclassified in 2016 in Colombia. They have a transparent body with a silver stripe along the side and a black spot near the tail. They also have red eyes and fins that can reflect blue or green colors.

Crystal tetras are peaceful and schooling fish that prefer to swim in the middle or lower levels of the tank. They need a well-planted tank with some driftwood and rocks to provide hiding places and shade. They also appreciate a gentle water flow and soft water. You may feed them live, frozen or freeze-dried foods and micropellets.

  • pH: 6.0-7.5
  • Temperature: 72-79°F (22-26°C)
  • Tank Size: 10 gallons (38 liters) or more
  • Fish Size: 1.5 inches (4 cm)
  • Lifespan: 3-5 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Moderate

Bleeding Heart Tetra (Hyphessobrycon Erythrostigma)

bleeding heart tetra care sheet

Bleeding heart tetras are beautiful fish known for their red heart-shaped spot on their chest. They are native to the Amazon basin and thrive in warm, soft and slightly acidic water. Bleeding heart tetras love to swim in groups of at least six. 

Bleeding heart tetras especially enjoy bloodworms, brine shrimp and daphnia.  They also like to have plenty of hiding spots and vegetation in their tank to provide a sense of security.  Bleeding Heart Tetras are great addition to any community tank with similar-sized and non-aggressive fish.

  • pH: 5.5-7.0
  • Temperature: 72-80°F 
  • Tank Size: 20 gallons or more
  • Fish Size: 2-3 inches 
  • Lifespan: 3-5 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Black Skirt Tetra (Gymnocorymbus Ternetzi)

Black Skirt Tetra Care Sheet

Black Skirt Tetras have a cool black coloring on their lower body that looks just like a skirt, hence their name “Black Skirt Tetras”. They’re also pretty popular for their distinguished tetragonal shape.

To keep Black Skirt Tetras happy and healthy, you’ll want to make sure they’ve got enough space in their tank to swim around, as well as some hiding spots. They also like their water a little warm and on the acidic side, and if you’re thinking about adding them in your tank, add at least six or more of them so they can hang out and socialize.

  • pH: 6.0-7.5
  • Temperature: 70-85° F
  • Tank Size: 15 gallons 
  • Fish Size: 3 inches 
  • Lifespan: 3-5 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

White Skirt Tetra (Gymnocorymbus Bondi)

The White Skirt Tetra is simply an albino or no-pigment variety of black tetras. They are easy to care for and will adapt to variety of water conditions. They are omnivorous fish, and will happily eat any kind of live, frozen or flake food you will feed them.

They will also be thrive in a tank with subdued lighting partnered with gravel substrate, and a lot of plants. Just remember, that they do require slightly different water parameters, to their black skirt counterparts.

  • pH: 5.8-8.0
  • Temperature: 70-90° F
  • Tank Size: 10 gallons 
  • Fish Size: 2 inches 
  • Lifespan: 5 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Black Phantom Tetra (Hyphessobrycon Megalopterus)

black phantom care sheet

Black phantom tetras like a well-planted tank (especially floating plants) with dim lighting and dark substrate like river sand. Toss in some dried leaves and driftwood for extra flair. Keep their water clean by changing it frequently since they are delicate about poor water quality.

As for their meals, black phantoms are happy campers and will chow down on most foods. Treat them to a variety of fine flake and freeze-dried foods, as well as some live foods like brine shrimp to keep them healthy and strong.

  • pH: 6.0-7.5
  • Temperature: 72-82° F
  • Tank Size: 10 gallons 
  • Fish Size: 1.75 inches 
  • Lifespan: 5 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Intermediate

Redeye Tetra (Moenkhausia Sanctaefilomenae)

red eye tetra care sheet

Redeye tetras are a chill fish that can handle different water conditions, whether it’s hard or soft, acidic or alkaline. They’re from places where the sun barely shines, so keep the lighting low, use dark substrate and add plants along the sides and back of their tank. 

In the wild, they go for worms, crustaceans, and insects. In captivity, you can feed them fine flake food, small granules, live or frozen brine shrimp, daphnia, tubifex, and frozen or freeze-dried bloodworms. Make sure to give them veggies like spinach to keep their colors looking vibrant. 

  • pH: 5.5-8.0
  • Temperature: 73-82° F
  • Tank Size: 20 gallons 
  • Fish Size: 2.75 inches 
  • Lifespan: 5 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Buenos Aires Tetra (Hyphessobrycon Anisitsi)

buenos Aires tetra care sheet

If you’re looking for an undemanding fish capable of adapting to different aquarium environments to take care of, go for Buenos Aires Tetras. They like to nibble on live plants, so it’s better to use artificial ones. The tank should have rocks, driftwood, and a cover, as they are jumpers.

When caring for Buenos Aires Tetras, water changes are essential, with at least 25-50% of the water changed every other week, especially if the tank is densely stocked. The tetras are omnivores and will eat anything, including worms, insects, and plants in the wild. Offer live, fresh, and flake foods, as well as lettuce or spinach.

  • pH: 5.8-8.5
  • Temperature: 64-82° F
  • Tank Size: 30 gallons 
  • Fish Size: 2.75 inches 
  • Lifespan: 5 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Congo Tetra (Phenacogrammus Interruptus)

Congo Tetra Care Sheet

Congo tetras are pretty tough, but only if you set up their tank just right. They like their water still, dark, and soft with a touch of peat filtering. You can make this happen with low light and floating plants. They also prefer darker gravel and love nibbling on plants that grow low to the ground.

These tetras are easy to feed. They chow down on live, fresh, and flaky food, plus brine shrimp and blood worms. Just give them small amounts several times a day. If your fish aren’t grubbing, don’t worry – they can be shy when you’re around. 

  • pH: 6.0-7.5
  • Temperature: 73-82° F
  • Tank Size: 30 gallons 
  • Fish Size: 2.5-3.5 inches 
  • Lifespan: 3-5 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Moderate

Ruby Tetra  (Axelrodia Riesei)

Ruby Tetra Care Sheet

To take care of your ruby tetras, you need to mimic their natural water conditions. These guys come from blackwater streams and prefer warm, nutrient-rich, slightly acidic and soft water. Just like their natural habitat, add a mix of floating plants and leave plenty of open space for swimming. 

For their diet, feed them a mix of high-protein flakes, pellets, and live food like Artemia, micro worms, Tubifex, bloodworms, and baby brine shrimp. Ruby tetras can be shy, so don’t worry if you don’t see them eating.

  • pH: 5.0-7.0
  • Temperature: 68-82° F
  • Tank Size: 10 gallons 
  • Fish Size:  1.6 inches 
  • Lifespan: 5-10 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Blue Tetra (Boehlkea Fredcochui)

In their natural homes, blue tetras live in shady, fresh waters with lots of floating and substrate-rooted plants. So, make sure to fill their tank with plenty of aquatic plants for shade and oxygenation. You can also add wood decorations, like driftwood or dried branches.

Provide your Blue Tetras with a varied diet of dry foods, like pellets, flakes, granules, or wafers. You can also give them frozen or freeze-dried foods, such as brine shrimp, infusoria, or worms, as a treat. To keep your blue tetras healthy, make sure the water is at the right temperature and has enough oxygen, and clean the tank regularly.

  • pH: 5.5-7.0
  • Temperature: 72-78° F
  • Tank Size: 20 gallons or bigger
  • Fish Size:  2 inches 
  • Lifespan: 2-4 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Colombian Tetra  (Hyphessobrycon Columbianus)

Colombian Tetra Care Sheet

Colombian Tetras are lively fish that need a well-planted aquarium and specific water conditions. They’re not the best choice for beginners, but with some experience, they are fun to care for. Choose the right substrate for plant growth and decorate your tank with plants before adding fish. 

Colombian Tetras aren’t picky when it comes to food and will eat most aquarium foods, including flake, frozen, and freeze-dried foods. To keep your Colombian tetras healthiest with the most vibrant colors, provide a varied diet including flake, frozen, and freeze-dried foods.

  • pH: 5.5-7.0
  • Temperature: 75-82° F
  • Tank Size: 20 gallons or bigger
  • Fish Size:  2-3 inches 
  • Lifespan: 3-5 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Moderate

Neon Tetra (Paracheirodon Innesi)

Neon Tetra Care Sheet

Neon tetras like dark, plant-filled habitats with hiding places.  Use driftwood and plants, including floating ones, to create a cozy home. However, when you’re setting up your tank, don’t add neon tetras right away. They need a mature and stable environment with soft, acidic water. 

Neon tetras will gobble up most types of food, so feel free to feed them a mix of fine flakes, small granules, live or frozen brine shrimp or daphnia, and frozen or freeze-dried bloodworms to keep them healthy. Try to offer them different kinds of food, including live ones.

  • pH: 4.0-7.5
  • Temperature: 72-78° F
  • Tank Size: 10 gallons or larger
  • Fish Size:  1.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 5-8 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Cardinal Tetra (Paracheirodon Axelrodi)

Cardinal Tetra Care Sheet

Cardinal tetras need an established tank with stable, soft, and acidic water. Keep lighting and decorations subdued, but provide floating plants to moderate the lighting. They need some hiding spots but also an open-water swimming area. A well-planted tank with an open center is ideal.

Cardinal tetras are omnivores and will eat most commercial fish foods. They require high vitamin intake, so at least 75% of their food should be quality flakes. They also like live and frozen foods, but offer prepared food too to prevent rejection later. 

  • pH: 5.3-7.8
  • Temperature: 73-81° F
  • Tank Size: 20 gallons or larger
  • Fish Size:  2 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Moderate

Black Neon Tetra (Hyphessobrycon Herbertaxelrodi)

black neon tetra care sheet

Black neon tetras can definitely adapt to different water conditions but love soft acidic water. For their habitat, give them some live plants, a dark substrate, and a bit of space to swim around. They like the mid to upper region of the tank, so ensure a good water current there. 

Keeping their water clean is super important, so change out at least 25 to 50 percent of the water every other week. As for their diet, black neons aren’t too picky and will eat most things. But to keep them healthy and looking good, mix it up with some flakes, frozen foods, and live worms or brine shrimp.

  • pH: 5.0-7.5
  • Temperature: 73-81° F
  • Tank Size: 20 gallons or larger
  • Fish Size:  1.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Green Neon Tetra (Paracheirodon Simulans)

Green Neon Tetra Care Sheet

When setting up an aquarium for your Green Neon Tetras, it’s important to recreate their natural environment. Use sandy substrate and decorations like driftwood and live plants like hornwort to provide shelter and keep the water clean. Also, they will love playing in open swimming spaces!

To feed your Green Neon Tetras, you have plenty of options. These fish are omnivores, so they’ll eat both meaty foods and veggies. Dried foods like flakes and pellets are cheap and easy to store, but lack nutrition. Add live or frozen foods like bloodworms, mosquito larvae, daphnia, and brine shrimp. 

  • pH: 5.0-6.5
  • Temperature: 75-84° F
  • Tank Size: 15 gallons or larger
  • Fish Size:  1.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 2-3 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Green Fire Tetra (Aphyocharax Rathbuni)

Green fire tetras are great for beginner fish keepers and don’t require too much work. Keep their tank clean and healthy so they don’t get sick. Green fire tetras come from freshwater basins with lots of floating plants and overhanging vegetation, so try to recreate that environment in your tank. 

Green Fire Tetras like to eat meat, so feed them high-quality fish pellets and mix it up with some yummy live or frozen foods like brine shrimp, bloodworms, and tubifex worms.

  • pH: 6.5-7
  • Temperature: 72-80° F
  • Tank Size: 15 Gallons
  • Fish Size:  1-2 inches
  • Lifespan: 3-6 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Moderate

Candy Cane Tetra (Hyphessobrycon Bentosi)

Candy Cane Tetra Care Sheet

Taking care of candy cane tetras is easy and suitable for beginners. They’re moderately hardy fish and prefer clean and stable water conditions. Candy cane tetras thrive and will feel at home in slow-moving, clean, and dimly lit water with floating plants, driftwood roots, and branches. 

Your Candy cane tetras are omnivores and will certainly be happy to eat a variety of food like flakes, pellets, and live food such as worms, shrimp, little fish, algae, and live plants.

  • pH: 6.6-7.8
  • Temperature: 73-82° F
  • Tank Size: 15 gallons
  • Fish Size:  2-3 inches
  • Lifespan: 3-5 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Rosy Tetra (Hyphessobrycon Rosaceus)

Rosy Tetra Care Sheet

Rosy Tetras like a planted tank, so give ’em some greenery to make ’em feel at home. Just don’t go overboard and leave plenty of space for ’em to swim. These little guys like slow-moving water, so no need for a powerhead, but do get a good filter and vacuum cleaner to keep things clean.

When it comes to your Rosy Tetra’s food, mix it up! They like a variety of stuff, from flakes to bloodworms and live foods. But watch out for leftovers, ’cause they’re prone to overeating. Feed ’em a few times a day for up to three minutes at a time. And make sure to get quality fish food so they don’t get sick.

  • pH: 5.5-7.5
  • Temperature: 75-82° F
  • Tank Size: 15 gallons 
  • Fish Size:  1.6 to 2.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 3-5 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Toucan Tetra (Tucanoichthys Tucano)

To keep your Toucan Tetras happy, you’ll want to set up their home just right. Sandy substrate, lots of driftwood roots and branches, and some almond leaves and peat will do the trick. Also, add some dried leaf litter for a natural vibe and extra hiding spots for your tetras. 

When it comes to food, Toucan Tetras are micropredators in the wild and eat tiny invertebrates and zooplankton. In the tank, they’ll go for dried foods but love small live and frozen stuff like Artemia nauplii, Daphnia, Moina, and grindal worm.

  • pH: 4.0-7.0
  • Temperature: 68-74° F
  • Tank Size: 20 gallons 
  • Fish Size:  0.75 inch
  • Lifespan: 5-7 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Diamond Tetra (Moenkhausia Pittieri)

Diamond Tetra Care Sheet

If you want to make your diamond tetras thrive, make sure their tank is full of plants and hiding spots. They like warm, slightly neutral water but can handle a bit of acidity too. A sand substrate, driftwood, and branches are all great additions to their Amazonian biotope setup.

For filtration, any standard system will work as long as it cycles the water several times an hour. And when it comes to food, diamond tetras are easy to please! Dry flakes or pellets with added vitamins are their main staple, but they’ll also enjoy occasional snacks like lettuce, brine shrimp, daphnia, and bloodworms.

  • pH: 5.5-7.5
  • Temperature: 72-82 F
  • Tank Size: 15 gallons 
  • Fish Size:  2 inches
  • Lifespan: 3-6 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Bloodfin Tetra (Aphyocharax Anisitsi)

Bloodfin Tetra Care Sheet

To create a natural environment for your Bloodfin Tetras, start with using a dark sand substrate. Then to make them even more joyful in their fish tank, use live plants like Java Moss, Anubias, and Anacharis for shelter and to block some light, mimicking their South American river habitat.

Bloodfin Tetras eat commercial flakes or pellets but supplement their diet with protein-rich snacks like brine shrimp, bloodworms, and daphnia. Only feed them as much as they can eat in 2 minutes, twice a day, to prevent overeating.

  • pH: 6.0-8.0
  • Temperature: 64-82° F
  • Tank Size: 20 gallons 
  • Fish Size:  2 inches
  • Lifespan: 5-8 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Moderate

Penguin Tetra (Thayeria Boehlkei)

Penguin Tetra Care Sheet

Penguin tetras are easy-to-care-for fish that love to swim in dense greenery so throw in lots of plants, tree roots, or driftwood to reduce stress. But don’t forget that they need plenty of room to swim around. One trick is to plant the walls of the tank so the school has more space to frolic.

Penguin Tetras are micro predators that typically munch on crustaceans, insects, larvae, and worms in the wild. But, they’ll happily scarf down prepared fish food in flake, freeze-dried, or pellet form. Treats like bloodworms, brine shrimp, and tubifex are also a hit. Also, Since they’re omnivores, make sure to mix in some algae to keep their nutritional balance on point.

  • pH: 6.0-8.0
  • Temperature: 72-82° F
  • Tank Size: 20 gallons 
  • Fish Size:  1.5-3 inches
  • Lifespan: 3-5 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy
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Flame Tetra (Hyphessobrycon Flammeus)

Your Flame Tetras will appreciate having lots of driftwood and roots in their tank. If you add some dried leaves to the sand, it will make the water look more like their natural habitat. Just make sure to swap them out every couple of weeks. 

As for their food, your Flame Tetras will scarf down anything from flakes to live food like brine shrimp and blood worms. Give them a few small meals throughout the day, and only give them what they can finish in three minutes or less.

  • pH: 5.5-7.5
  • Temperature: 72-82° F
  • Tank Size: 10 gallons 
  • Fish Size:  1.6 inches
  • Lifespan: 3-5 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Silvertip Tetra (Hasemania Nana)

Silvertip Tetra Care Sheet

To make your silvertip tetras’ tanks feel like home, make their tank feel like a warm creek. Cover the bottom with fine sand and add a little driftwood, rocks, and leaves to recreate their natural environment. They like some plant coverage, too, so add some hardy ones.

Even though they eat insects and plant stuff in the wild, they’ll still love flakes or granules for their meals in captivity. Look for nutritious and balanced formulas that can keep them healthy and colorful.

  • pH: 6.0-8.0
  • Temperature: 72–82°F
  • Tank Size: 20 gallons 
  • Fish Size:  1.2 inches
  • Lifespan: 5-8 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Lemon Tetra (Hyphessobrycon Pulchripinnis)

Lemon tetra care sheet

To make your lemon tetras look amazing, set up their tank like their natural Amazon habitat. Use fine sand, driftwood, and plants for a forest feel. Keep the tank dimly lit and use a normal filter for gentle water flow.

When it comes to food, lemon tetras aren’t picky eaters. They’ll eat anything you give them! Start with high-quality dried food, and give them some live, frozen, or freeze-dried snacks every once in a while to keep their diet interesting.

  • pH: 6.0-8.0
  • Temperature: 72-82° F
  • Tank Size: 20 gallons 
  • Fish Size:  2 inches
  • Lifespan: 6-8 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

GloFish® Tetra (Gymncorymbus Ternetzi)

Glofish Tetra Care Sheet

If you’re thinking of getting a school of Glofish tetras, you’ll need some essential equipment like a heater and a filtering system. The filter removes harmful ammonia from the water and supports the beneficial bacteria that keep the tank healthy. Also, add plants and rocks for their enjoyment.

When it comes to feeding your Glofish tetras, variety is key. They’ll eat pretty much anything, including fish food pellets, flakes, chips, and frozen or live food like brine shrimp and bloodworms. Homemade meals are a great option, especially if you grow your own food cultures.

  • pH: 6.0-7.0
  • Temperature: 72-82° F
  • Tank Size: 20 gallons 
  • Fish Size:  1.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 3-5 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Glowlight Tetra (Hemigrammus Erythrozonus)

Glowlight Tetra Care Sheet

Glowlight tetras are not picky about water conditions, but they’ll definitely love their tanks dim with lots of plants and open space for swimming. Use a dark substrate and tannins to soften and darken the water. Floating plants are a great finishing touch.

Feed your glowlights a varied diet of small-sized foods like flakes, freeze-dried, frozen, and live foods. Don’t give them too much at once since they won’t eat food that’s fallen to the bottom.

  • pH: 5.8-7.5
  • Temperature: 74-82° F
  • Tank Size: 10 gallons 
  • Fish Size:  1.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Loreto Tetra (Bryconamericus Caucanus)

Your Loreto Tetras come from the Amazon River in Peru. They like living in streams with lots of plants and leaves. If you want to keep some in an aquarium, make sure there’s lots of hiding places and plants, driftwood, and use a dark substrate. Also, keep them in groups of at least 10.

Feed your Loreto Tetras with quality flakes or pellets, white mosquito larvae and daphnia, and treats like bloodworms or brine shrimp a couple of times a week.

  • pH: 5.5-7.0
  • Temperature: 72-78° F
  • Tank Size: 20 gallons 
  • Fish Size:  1 inch
  • Lifespan: 5-7 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Moderate

Long-Finned Tetra (Hemigrammus Caudovittatus)

Long Finned Black Tetras like soft, peat-filtered water and a well-lit tank with plants for cover. They also need open space to swim around. Make sure to cover the tank because they’re good jumpers. Also, use river sand as the substrate and add some driftwood or beech branches for hiding spots. 

These tetras are not picky eaters, so give them a mix of live, fresh, and flake food. They love brine shrimp and blood worms as a treat. Feed them a few times a day, but don’t overdo it. Only give them what they can eat in 3 minutes.

  • pH: 5.8-8.5
  • Temperature: 70-79° F
  • Tank Size: 20 gallons 
  • Fish Size: 2 inches
  • Lifespan: 6-7 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Red-Base Tetra (Hemigrammus Bleheri)

Red base tetras are easy to keep in a biotope setup. Just use river sand, driftwood branches (common beech works too if you can’t find the right kind of driftwood), and some twisted roots. You can add a small net bag of peat to the filter to get the black water vibe going. Keep the lighting low.

If you want, you can also set them up in a well-maintained tank with lots of plants. Since they’re usually caught in the wild, they’re not used to more general setups. Red base tetras eat small invertebrates in the wild, but in the tank, they’ll eat just about anything. Give them a mix of dried flakes, granules, and small live or frozen foods.

  • pH: 6.2-7.2
  • Temperature: 73-79° F
  • Tank Size: 20 gallons 
  • Fish Size:  1.7 inches
  • Lifespan: 5-8 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Serpae Tetra (Hyphessobrycon Eques)

Serpae Tetra Care Sheet

The serpae tetra likes living in Amazon-like habitats – quiet waters with roots and organic debris. To make their environment feel more like home, add peat or blackwater extract to the tank. Make sure to use a dark-colored substrate, and keep the lighting a bit subdued. 

Serpae Tetras are easy to feed omnivores, and they will eat almost anything, including flake, pellet, freeze-dried, and frozen foods. In the wild, Serpae Tetras eat small live foods like insects and worms, so consider mixing it up and offering live foods when available. 

  • pH: 5.0-7.8
  • Temperature: 72-79° F
  • Tank Size: 20 gallons 
  • Fish Size:  1.75 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Red Phantom Tetra (Hyphessobrycon Sweglesi)

Red Phantom Tetra Care Sheet

Caring for red phantom tetras is a breeze, but with the right conditions. Just include lots of plants in the tank to provide hiding and socializing spaces for the fish and add floating leaves and surface vegetation for shade. Lastly Indian almond leaves can also release tannins that are beneficial for the fish.

When it comes to feeding, red phantom tetras are not picky eaters. They’ll gladly eat fine-grained meals like TetraMin Tropical flakes and Tetra Rubin granules to boost their immunity. The granules stay in the upper and mid-levels of the tank, where the red phantom tetras like to eat and swim.

  • pH: 6.0-7.5
  • Temperature: 68-73°F
  • Tank Size: 20 gallons 
  • Fish Size:  1.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Easy

Bucktooth Tetra (Exodon Paradoxus)

Bucktooth tetras aren’t plant-lovers; they’re too busy being wild and aggressive! But, they still need a little greenery to zip through. Keep the plants around the edges to create a natural look and give them some open swimming space. As for the substrate, dark sand is the way to go. 

Bucktooth tetras are carnivores and eat mainly fish scales in the wild. To keep them happy in captivity, provide them with live or dead feeder fish or some other high-protein grub like brine shrimp or bloodworms.

  • pH: 5.0-7.5
  • Temperature: 72-82° F
  • Tank Size: 55 gallons 
  • Fish Size:  4-5 inches
  • Lifespan: 10 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Moderate

Mexican Tetra/Blind Cave Tetra (Astyanax Mexicanus)

Blind Cave Tetra Care Sheet

The blind cave tetra might seem hard to care for since it’s sightless, but it’s actually not that much different from other tetras. When setting up your tank, fill it with sand or gravel and a few rocks, and driftwood. Floating plants will also keep the tank nice and shaded.

In the wild, they eat bugs and tiny crustaceans, but in captivity, they’ll eat commercial flake or pellet foods and fresh, frozen, or freeze-dried foods. Blood worms and brine shrimp are their favorites, but sinking pellets or wafers are also good for when they scavenge the bottom.

  • pH: 6.5-8.0
  • Temperature: 68-77° F
  • Tank Size: 20 gallons 
  • Fish Size:  5 inches
  • Lifespan: 3-5 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Moderate

Flag Tetra (Hyphessobrycon Heterorhabdus)

Flag Tetras are peaceful fish that get along with other peaceful fish. Soft, slightly acidic water is best for them, and using peat in your filter is a good idea. If you want their colors to really pop, give them a dark substrate and low light.

In the wild, flag tetras are into eating a mix of stuff like small bugs, crustaceans, algae, and fruit that falls in the water. In a tank, however, dried food is fine but they’ll be happier with a variety. Bloodworms, mosquito larvae, Daphnia, Moina, and other live or frozen foods are great for them.

  • pH: 5.5-7.5
  • Temperature: 73-82° F
  • Tank Size: 10 gallons 
  • Fish Size:  2 inches
  • Lifespan: 5-7 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Intermediate

Panda Tetra (Aphyocharax Paraguayensis)

Panda Tetra Care Sheet

To take care of your panda tetras, you gotta set up a tank with just them in it, and plenty of plants at the back and sides to make room for them to swim around up front. These little guys like it dark, so keep the lighting low and toss in some floating plants to help with that. 

Panda tetras thrive with live food, but they’ll also settle for quality flakes or pellets. As treats, hit them up with some brine shrimp, blood worms, or white worms. They’ll eat almost anything you give them, just make sure it’s small enough for their tiny mouths!

  • pH: 5.5-7.5
  • Temperature: 72-82° F
  • Tank Size: 20 gallons 
  • Fish Size:  up to 2 inches
  • Lifespan: 5 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Intermediate

Rainbow Tetra (Nematobrycon Lacortei)

Creating a cozy home for your Rainbow Tetras is exciting, but you gotta keep an eye on their needs too. Start with a soft sand substrate and add some tree branches and leaf litter to mimic their natural habitat. Next, add live plants with plenty of foliage to create a natural ecosystem. 

Rainbow Tetras aren’t fussy eaters and don’t eat much due to their small size. rovide balanced commercial fish food as a diet staple, such as floating flakes and pellets. And if you want to spoil them, offer high-value snacks like bloodworms, daphnia, and mosquito larvae.

  • pH: 6.0-7.2
  • Temperature: 72-80° F
  • Tank Size: 30 gallons 
  • Fish Size:  1.5 inches
  • Lifespan: 3-5 years
  • Difficulty Keeping: Intermediate

(If you want to know about even more fish, then check out all the community fish you can add to your tank!)

Types Of Tetra_ Top 41 Species With Care Sheets

How To Set Up A Tank For Tetras

Setting up a tank for tetras is an exciting and rewarding experience, but it’s important to get it right from the start to ensure the health and well-being of your fish. Here’s a step-by-step guide on how to set up a tank for tetras:

Choosing the Tank

The first step is to choose the right tank size for your tetras. As a general rule, a 20-gallon tank is recommended for most tetra species, but smaller species like Ember Tetras can do well in tanks as small as 10 gallons. It’s important to choose a tank that is made from high-quality materials and has a sturdy stand to support its weight.

Adding Substrate

Once you have your tank, the next step is to add substrate to the bottom. Tetras prefer a dark-colored substrate, such as black sand or gravel, as it helps to enhance their vibrant coloration. Aim for a substrate depth of around 2-3 inches.

Installing Filtration

Filtration is essential for maintaining good water quality in your tetra tank. A high-quality filtration system should be installed, and it’s recommended to choose a filter that is rated for a tank size larger than the one you have to ensure maximum efficiency.

Adding Decorations

Tetras love to have plenty of hiding places and plants in their tank. Add plants like Java moss, Java fern, or Amazon swords to your tetra tank to provide hiding places for your fish. You can also add decorations like rocks or driftwood to enhance the overall aesthetics of the tank.

Setting Up Lighting

Lighting is crucial in any aquarium setup, and tetras thrive in well-lit environments. Choose a light that provides a full spectrum of colors and a timer to simulate a natural day and night cycle.

Adding Water and Conditioning

After setting up the decorations and lighting, it’s time to add water to the tank. Fill the tank with water and use a water conditioner to remove any harmful chemicals and chlorine from the tap water.

Cycling the Tank

Before adding your tetras to the tank, it’s essential to cycle the tank to establish a healthy bacterial colony that can break down waste and maintain good water quality. This process can take several weeks, so it’s important to be patient and let the tank cycle fully before adding any fish.

Adding Tetras

Once the tank has cycled, it’s time to add your tetras. It’s important to acclimate your fish slowly to their new environment by floating the bag in the tank for 15-20 minutes before releasing them. Avoid overcrowding your tank, and make sure to provide enough hiding places and plants for your tetras to feel comfortable.

Tank Mates For Tetras

There are many great tank mates for Tetras. Corydoras catfish, guppies, dwarf gouramis, swordtails, harlequin rasboras, otocinclus catfish, and platies are just a few excellent choices for a community aquarium.

Corydoras Catfish

bronze/common corydoras care sheet

Corydoras catfish are peaceful bottom-dwellers that will happily coexist with tetras. They are social creatures and should be kept in groups of at least 6. Corydoras catfish are also great cleaners, and they will help keep the aquarium clean by eating leftover food and algae.

Guppies

guppy care sheet

Guppies are small and colorful fish that make excellent tank mates for tetras. They are active and peaceful, and they will thrive along with your tetras. Guppies are also easy to care for and will thrive in a community aquarium.

Dwarf Gouramis

Dwarf Gourami Care Sheet

Dwarf gouramis are easy to care for and come in a variety of colors. Dwarf gouramis prefer planted aquariums so they will appreciate an environment with lots of live plants.

Swordtails

Swordtail Care Sheet

Swordtails are beautiful vibrant fish that are perfect to live with your tetras. They have colorful tails will add a lot of visual interest to the aquarium. Swordtails also enjoy swimming in the middle and upper parts of the aquarium, so they will not compete with tetras for space.

Harlequin Rasboras

harlequin rasbora care sheet

Harlequin rasboras are playful little fish that will coexist well in a tank with tetras. They are easy to care for and will appreciate an aquarium with lots of plants and hiding places. Harlequin rasboras are also active swimmers and will add a lot of movement to the aquarium.

Otocinclus Catfish

otocinclus catfish care sheet

Otocinclus catfish are small and peaceful fish that will help keep the aquarium clean by eating algae. Although they are active swimmers, they will not compete with tetras for space.

Platies

platy care sheet

Platies are peaceful, colorful fish that make great tank mates for tetras. They are small, active fish that come in a wide range of colors and patterns. Platies are also easy to care for and breed readily in the aquarium.

What Fish Do Tetras Not Get Along With

Tetras are peaceful fish that generally get along well with other peaceful fish that occupy different levels of the aquarium. However, there are some fish species that tetras may not get along with, including:

Aggressive fish – Aggressive fish, such as cichlids or bettas, may attack and harass tetras, which can lead to stress, injury, and even death.

Large fish – Large fish, such as angelfish or discus, may view tetras as prey and attempt to eat them. Additionally, large fish may intimidate and bully tetras, causing them to hide and become stressed.

Bottom-dwelling fish – Bottom-dwelling fish, such as loaches or catfish, may compete with tetras for food and territory. Additionally, some bottom-dwelling fish may be territorial and aggressive towards tetras.

Fast-swimming fish – Fast-swimming fish, such as danios or barbs, may outcompete tetras for food and may harass them by chasing and nipping their fins.

FAQ

Here are some frequently asked questions that people have about the different types of tetra!

How Many Types Of Tetra Are There?

There are over 150 different species of tetras, each with their own unique characteristics and behaviors. Some of the most popular tetra species include neon tetras, cardinal tetras, black skirt tetras, and serpae tetras.

Which Tetras Are Peaceful?

Many tetra species are peaceful fish that get along well with other peaceful fish that occupy different levels of the aquarium. Some of the most peaceful tetra species include neon tetras, cardinal tetras, ember tetras, and lemon tetras. 

What Is The Most Aggressive Tetra?

One of the most aggressive tetra species is the Buenos Aires tetra. When they’re kept with slow fish or in a smaller group than they need, they’re prone to nipping at the fins of other fish and even attacking and killing smaller fish. 

What’s The Hardiest Tetra?

One of the hardiest tetra species is the black skirt tetra. Black skirt tetras are known for their hardy nature and ability to adapt to a variety of water conditions. They are also relatively easy to care for and are suitable for beginner aquarists.

How Many Tetras In A Tank Minimum

In general, tetras are schooling fish and do best in groups of six or more. This allows them to feel more secure and reduces stress and aggression.

Conclusion

Tetras are a diverse and fascinating group of freshwater fish that are popular for their beautiful colors, active behavior, and peaceful temperament. When keeping tetras, it’s important to provide them with a suitable tank environment that meets their needs, including proper water conditions, adequate space, and a school of six or more. With the right care, tetras can thrive and provide years of enjoyment.

About the author

Hey! I'm Antonio!

Betta fish keeper for over 6 years now! Since owning a betta I've also housed all kinds of tropical fish, and have seen all manner of problems and how to look after them!

If you need any advice you can always message me or better yet join the Facebook group where a community can answer your questions!

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